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D&D Movie/TV Bridgerton Star Regé-Jean Page Joins D&D Movie

Regé-Jean Page has joined the cast of the upcoming Dungeons & Dragons movie - which currently has Chris Pine, Michelle Rodriguez, and Justice Smith attached - in a leading role, according to Hollywood Reporter. He played the Duke of Hastings in the period drama which is Netflix's biggest ever show.

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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey





ART!

Adventurer
I'm assuming Chris Pine is the/a main character, and a fighter-y type.
Page is pretty suave on Bridgerton, so maybe someone more rogueish...but I could also really see him as a paladin.
But that's just unimaginative fan-casting on my part. I hope to be surprised.
 


ART!

Adventurer
I'm sorry, Bridgerton is Netflix's biggest ever show? By what metric?
By there own account, I think. They don't release their numbers much.
Regardless, it's one of the newest, biggest shows "everyone" is talking about. I've watched it, and though I dislike a few things about it, it's fun. Page is a pretty good actor, I think, and definitely has some real screen presence.
 


Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
Huh that's surprising. I watched the first episode, and it seemed incredibly slow. Definitely not my taste, though Page was probably better than most of the actors in the show.
 

TheSword

Legend
Supporter
It picks up. I was skeptical but really enjoyed it. The pace as far as period dramas go ramps up pretty fast. Lots going on. At least six or seven storylines intertwined. Glad to hear it’s been renewed.
 


Jaeger

That someone better.
What other metric does Netflix have... viewers! My good man!

Pride and Prejudice meets Gossip Girl, without the whitewash.

Given the social and historical setting of the books, a so-called "whitewash" would have been entirely appropriate for the material.

Worth noting that Netflix changed what it counts as a view last year:

"The new definition, stated in a footnote in Netflix’s letter, states that a view means a subscriber “Chose to watch and did watch for at least 2 minutes — long enough to indicate the choice was intentional.” A Netflix spokesman confirmed that the definition means a single two-minute viewing of a single episode would lead to counting that viewing in its accounting of the entire series, and said that the goal was to convey the popularity of a given program instead of its actual viewership."


Given that Julia Quinn is a very popular author and her Bridgerton series of books sold a ton, the big numbers for Netflix are not surprising.

That being said - my parents who are big fans of the genre could not make it through the first episode due to the ahistorical casting choices for the British nobility of the era. They also commented that the costumes were also very wrong for the era in several places. They will not continue to watch the series , but they definitely counted as a 'view' for Netflix.

Netflix is of course banking in the long run that Adapting Julia Quinn's stories and verse, along with the enthusiasm of her fan base to see a live action version of the novels will outweigh any misgivings of the obviously ahistorical elements that have been introduced.

And that may be a bet that they will win, as they have already renewed a second season.
 

TwoSix

Unserious gamer
Supporter
That being said - my parents who are big fans of the genre could not make it through the first episode due to the ahistorical casting choices for the British nobility of the era. They also commented that the costumes were also very wrong for the era in several places. They will not continue to watch the series , but they definitely counted as a 'view' for Netflix.
To be fair to the show, the reasons for the casting are explained within the narrative. It makes the show more alt-historical than actual historical, but if that lets you cast a Regé-Jean Page, that's certainly a win in my book.
 

TheSword

Legend
Supporter
Given the social and historical setting of the books, a so-called "whitewash" would have been entirely appropriate for the material.

Worth noting that Netflix changed what it counts as a view last year:

"The new definition, stated in a footnote in Netflix’s letter, states that a view means a subscriber “Chose to watch and did watch for at least 2 minutes — long enough to indicate the choice was intentional.” A Netflix spokesman confirmed that the definition means a single two-minute viewing of a single episode would lead to counting that viewing in its accounting of the entire series, and said that the goal was to convey the popularity of a given program instead of its actual viewership."


Given that Julia Quinn is a very popular author and her Bridgerton series of books sold a ton, the big numbers for Netflix are not surprising.

That being said - my parents who are big fans of the genre could not make it through the first episode due to the ahistorical casting choices for the British nobility of the era. They also commented that the costumes were also very wrong for the era in several places. They will not continue to watch the series , but they definitely counted as a 'view' for Netflix.

Netflix is of course banking in the long run that Adapting Julia Quinn's stories and verse, along with the enthusiasm of her fan base to see a live action version of the novels will outweigh any misgivings of the obviously ahistorical elements that have been introduced.

And that may be a bet that they will win, as they have already renewed a second season.

Netflix counts every shows viewing the same, regardless of the method by which it counts them. It’s all relative. So when Netflix says it’s the most watched show, it’s the most watched show.

You do understand that it’s fiction right and artistic license? In the same way that Pride and Prejudice is fiction or Dickens. I watched an all male cast perform Twelfth Night in the theatre before lockdown. That was how all Shakespeare was performed originally... though not at all accurate eh?

The music is also not historically accurate either, being classical adaptions of pop songs. However we hear the music as they would have heard it, contemporary for its time. In the same way we see the cast as they would have seen it, contemporary for our time. In a toss up between historically accurate (as a result of atrocious racism) and accessible then I’d pick the latter every time.

I think the ratings have demonstrated that we don’t need to exclude everyone who isn’t white Caucasian from casting in order to create a successful piece of period entertainment. You’re crazy if you think this is just the result of the authors loyal fan base.

It’s a shame your parents couldn’t look beyond the colour. Be it costumes or otherwise.
 
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Ath-kethin

Elder Thing
Nice casting news, but I'd frankly have a lot more faith in the film if they began referring to it as, say, The Crystal Shard or Dragons of Autumn Twilight or similar. Those are the names of successful, interesting, and popular stories.

"Dungeons & Dragons," on the other hand, is quite the opposite. As a movie, anyway.
 

MarkB

Legend
Nice casting news, but I'd frankly have a lot more faith in the film if they began referring to it as, say, The Crystal Shard or Dragons of Autumn Twilight or similar. Those are the names of successful, interesting, and popular stories.

"Dungeons & Dragons," on the other hand, is quite the opposite. As a movie, anyway.
If they are indeed choosing a particular setting or story they'll keep it under wraps as long as possible, because they know that for every fan of whichever one they choose who is delighted, there'll be ten more who are furious that their favourite didn't get chosen.

And it would do nothing to market the show to the larger non-D&D-fan audience who have no idea what any of those titles signify.
 


Jaeger

That someone better.
...The music is also not historically accurate either, being classical adaptions of pop songs. However we hear the music as they would have heard it, contemporary for its time. In the same way we see the cast as they would have seen it, contemporary for our time. ...

People have varying tolerances for ahistorical elements in period pieces that they are able to assimilate when immersing themselves in a story.

Lots of people enjoyed A Knight's Tale. To others it was unwatchable, precisely because it was ahistorical as hell.

No other motives need be inferred from either preference.


It’s a shame your parents couldn’t look beyond the colour. Be it costumes or otherwise.

My parents, are both fans of the genre and rather well read on the history of the era. They are what anyone looking at them side by side would call a mixed race couple, and they simply found the ahistorical elements immersion breaking for them.

Finding ahistorical elements immersion breaking, just means that they found them immersion breaking.

Inferring a racial prejudice to their perception of a show that is adapted from a well known literary genre that prides itself on portraying period historical accuracy in terms of speech, dress, and culture is laughable.


... In a toss up between historically accurate (as a result of atrocious racism) and accessible then I’d pick the latter every time.

If you really believe that the ethnic make up of the British Nobility and upper class in Regency England was the result of atrocious racism, then you have just admitted to a startling degree of historical ignorance.

Also just a bit insulting to many fans and authors of the Regency romance genre about the "accessibility" of the books they like. Obviously authors like Stacy Reid could use a few pointers from you.


I think the ratings have demonstrated that we don’t need to exclude everyone who isn’t white Caucasian from casting in order to create a successful piece of period entertainment. You’re crazy if you think this is just the result of the authors loyal fan base. ...

The authors loyal fanbase plus several other factors I listed. But hey maybe you're right, if Netflix did their own Regency Romance series not based on bestselling books, and without Julia Quinn's name attached it surely could have done just as well...

I also said it was a bet Netflix could win. If they have hit on a Regency Romance version of A Knight's Tale, then they'll run with what works.
 
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