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D&D Movie/TV Bridgerton Star Regé-Jean Page Joins D&D Movie

Regé-Jean Page has joined the cast of the upcoming Dungeons & Dragons movie - which currently has Chris Pine, Michelle Rodriguez, and Justice Smith attached - in a leading role, according to Hollywood Reporter. He played the Duke of Hastings in the period drama which is Netflix's biggest ever show.

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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey

I don't see any reason why they would do that.

We have no reason to assume the currently announced cast members are "the party".

Page clearly has a ridiculously high charisma, which is why people are suggesting he play a warlock.

I've seen at least five Pine movies, and I really can't see him as a cleric or paladin. He is almost always a maverick, rogue or rebel who ignores the rulebook. And, given that GotG is the model, "the party" are likely to be a bunch of outlaws-turned-reluctant-heroes, not a bunch of Dudley-Do-Rights who have a paladin. Any paladins will probably throw the heroes in prison before failing to defeat the Big Bad because they play by the book.
Nice pre-5e viewpoint of paladins. They are quite a bit more flexible these days.

Unless we get another major casting announcement, Pine is almost certainly the lead, and given his physique, I'm guessing he's going to be some sort of melee type, if not a paladin, a fighter-type at least.
 

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Nice pre-5e viewpoint of paladins. They are quite a bit more flexible these days.
A movie has to use a traditional stereotypical view of classes. If it doesn't act like a paladin how will the audience know it's a paladin? How will they know what a paladin is?

Even in 5e, paladin have oaths they have to keep. Doesn't fit with someone known for playing serial rule-breakers.
Unless we get another major casting announcement, Pine is almost certainly the lead, and given his physique, I'm guessing he's going to be some sort of melee type, if not a paladin, a fighter-type at least.
His physique is athletic but not burly. All that tells us is he is unlikely to be playing a wizard or a barbarian. He might be playing a fighter, but he could just as well be a rogue or a ranger or a bard.
 
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Istbor

Dances with Gnolls
They do that all the time. Watch some Harry Potter films, or Star Wars films, or superhero films. Any sci-fi/fantasy franchise, really.
Yes, but are those all well established franchises that can power threw covering up famous faces. I mean look at the two you cited right off the bat. They are going to make money regardless. A movie positioned like D&D with a rough history already kind of needs every advantage they can get. Especially as a generic fantasy movie.
 

Yes, but are those all well established franchises that can power threw covering up famous faces. I mean look at the two you cited right off the bat. They are going to make money regardless. A movie positioned like D&D with a rough history already kind of needs every advantage they can get. Especially as a generic fantasy movie.
None of them were well established when they covered up the first name actor's face
 

ART!

Adventurer
I love how we're all movie industry experts! ;)

I mean, I know a decent amount about how movies get made (I've been a devourer of that kind of thing since I was old enough to understand how stop-motion worked, and studied filmmaking in college) and I don't see how we can know much at this point, other than the broadest of genre assumptions and that Chris Pine will be a major character.

Not getting on anyone's case, because it's fun to wonder and speculate, but I'm not going to assume I know what's going on here yet.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
A movie has to use a traditional stereotypical view of classes. If it doesn't act like a paladin how will the audience know it's a paladin? How will they know what a paladin is?
A person of deep faith who fights for what they believe in. That doesn't require any sort of pre-5e ideas about paladins.
Even in 5e, paladin have oaths they have to keep. Doesn't fit with someone known for playing serial rule-breakers.
He plays a starfleet captain. Playing a Paladin would be right up his alley.
 


A person of deep faith who fights for what they believe in. That doesn't require any sort of pre-5e ideas about paladins.
1) Doesn't really fit with the GotG theme, for a party member;
2) Faith in what? You planning an info drop on the setting's religions (or Nova Corps equivalent)?
3) How does it differ from an annoyingly moralistic fighter? Or, if you are going with 5e, any sort of fighter at all?
He plays a starfleet captain. Playing a Paladin would be right up his alley.
You clearly haven't seen the Pine Star Trek movies. He plays a Starfleet captain who breaks all the rules.

Shatner-Kirk is positively square compared to Pine-Kirk.

Summary of Pine-Kirk's Starfleet career:
  • Juvenile delinquent and adrenaline junky involved in petty crime and barroom brawls;
  • Dared to join Starfleet by the intervention of Pike;
  • Is about to be expelled from Starfleet academy for cheating when a crisis means he is assigned to the Enterprise as a Ensign;
  • Mutinies and is marooned by the Enterprise's acting captain;
  • Seizes command of the Enterprise ands saves the Earth;
  • Is awarded command of the Enterprise;
  • Breaks the Prime Directive to save a friend, leading to a pre-industrial society worshiping the Enterprise as a god;
  • Falsifies his log to cover up breaking the Prime Directive;
  • Is stripped of command;
  • Another crisis leads to him being put back in command of the Enterprise - it turns out because he is considered a rule-breaking maverick;
  • Fires Scotty for refusing to break the rules;
  • Disobeys his direct orders;
  • Saves the Earth again;
  • Is bored to the teeth with all this five year mission diplomacy nonsense;
  • Considers resigning;
  • Gets his ship blown up;
  • Saves the Federation;
  • Decides not to resign, having been reminded of why he joined Starfleet in the first place - to punch bad guys until his fists are bloody.

Conclusion: definitely not a paladin.

It's notable that whenever Pine takes a role previously played by other actors (which is quite often) the Pine version is more roguish than the original.
 
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doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
1) Doesn't really fit with the GotG theme, for a party member;
They aren’t remaking GoTG, but fantasy. It was referenced in relation to tone , a while ago. That’s it.
2) Faith in what? You planning an info drop on the setting's religions (or Nova Corps equivalent)?
No need.
3) How does it differ from an annoyingly moralistic fighter? Or, if you are going with 5e, any sort of fighter at all?
He answers to a god and is trying to make the world better, and has magic powers.
. He plays a Starfleet captain who breaks all the rules.
That is literally my exact point, yes.
 

They aren’t remaking GoTG, but fantasy. It was referenced in relation to tone , a while ago. That’s it.
And an important part of that tone is it is a picaresque - the protagonists are rogues (not the class).
No need.

He answers to a god and is trying to make the world better, and has magic powers.
5e paladins do not have to answer to a god, but if they do, you are going to have to explain that god. If your central character is particularly religious then your movie is going to be about religion. Heavy stuff for an action-comedy.

Pretty much everyone in 5e has magic powers. "Has no magic powers" would be more distinctive.
 

ART!

Adventurer
5e paladins do not have to answer to a god, but if they do, you are going to have to explain that god. If your central character is particularly religious then your movie is going to be about religion. Heavy stuff for an action-comedy.
To use the GOTG comparison, in all the GOTG movies and their appearances, they've spent maybe a total of a minute explaining Rocket's origin/backstory, and before the fact it would have been easy to think audiences would need more information. They don't.
 

To use the GOTG comparison, in all the GOTG movies and their appearances, they've spent maybe a total of a minute explaining Rocket's origin/backstory, and before the fact it would have been easy to think audiences would need more information. They don't.
Rocket wasn't the main character. If they did a Rocket movie, they would have to delve deeper into Rocket's backstory (as the Rocket comic does).

Same goes for a clerical party member. If they are not the lead you don't need to explain their religion. "I heal you in the name of Hogran the Humourless" is sufficient. But if they are the main character, and religion is the major trait of that character, then you are doing a story about religion (See: Cleric Quintet)
 

Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
Rocket wasn't the main character. If they did a Rocket movie, they would have to delve deeper into Rocket's backstory (as the Rocket comic does).

Same goes for a clerical party member. If they are not the lead you don't need to explain their religion. "I heal you in the name of Hogran the Humourless" is sufficient. But if they are the main character, and religion is the major trait of that character, then you are doing a story about religion (See: Cleric Quintet)

Why? I mean, unless the religion is a central part of the plot why do you need anything other than "By the hammer of Grabthar"? In my experience that's all we get when someone is playing a cleric in a standard D&D game. I don't see why a movie would be different.

Novels, in particular novels that have a solo protagonist, don't need to go into that level of detail.
 

ART!

Adventurer
Rocket wasn't the main character. If they did a Rocket movie, they would have to delve deeper into Rocket's backstory (as the Rocket comic does).

Same goes for a clerical party member. If they are not the lead you don't need to explain their religion. "I heal you in the name of Hogran the Humourless" is sufficient. But if they are the main character, and religion is the major trait of that character, then you are doing a story about religion (See: Cleric Quintet)
Fair point. GOTG spends an awful lot of time on Quill's backstory.

This begs the question: will this be more of an ensemble piece, or a starring vehicle? GOTG is sort of...both, I think?

I'm hoping for something more like the Ocean's or Expendables movies (there's other examples, I'm sure, and those might not be the best), where you technically have a main character, but really a few actors share the limelight pretty evenly.
 

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