D&D 5E Deck of Many Things Release Delayed

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Scribe

Legend
This image about Microsoft exists for a reason

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I would imagine the D&D and Magic Teams are not hostile to each other, but I doubt they communicate very often.

That image is great, and while I can understand this (I sadly really really can) I think it reflects poorly on Wizards regardless, just as it does on MS, or our own companies.

If the little brother cannot call on big brother when its something in his wheelhouse, that is dysfunctional. Its still the same company.
 

Vaalingrade

Legend
If they're so separate that they don't communicate when one might have useful knowledge that the other team can use, that's wildly dysfunctional.

That seems really unlikely to me.
"My dearest right hand. I have been away at war lo these many years, but not a day passes what I do not think of you can wonder what you are doing."

Yours, the left hand.
 

If they're so separate that they don't communicate when one might have useful knowledge that the other team can use, that's wildly dysfunctional.

That seems really unlikely to me.
Yes, it is wildly dysfunctional.

But, sorry, it is also really likely and the norm for large corporations and having worked in multiple businesses of different sizes, am zero percent surprised by this.

It's so common, it's practically a cliche that as corporations become successful and grow, they become internally dysfunctional and fragmented. In hindsight from the outside, it seems like an obvious problem to avoid, but from the inside, in the thick of it, it is far more the standard than the exception.

Heck, the university IT people I work with are typically re-inventing the wheel about a dozen separate ways across campus because everyone's too busy doing their own job to figure out how to help someone else they never interact with do theirs. You would think upper management would solve this problem, but in large enough organizations, by the time information reaches upper management, it has lost so much detail that they are just focusing on larger strategy and are, of course, unaware of nitty-gritty details. It's simply the nature of large organizations that things get silo'ed, and the communication between silos is rare and at too high of a level to be aware of any nuance or details.

Now it should have been obvious for the D&D team to work with the M:tG team on this, but maybe they did and, again, it was just at a high level of detail of quality vendors, package sizing, InDesign templates, etc. that missed the nuances of making sure to account for humidity when dealing with foil cards.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
Yes, it is wildly dysfunctional.

But, sorry, it is also really likely and the norm for large corporations and having worked in multiple businesses of different sizes, am zero percent surprised by this.

It's so common, it's practically a cliche that as corporations become successful and grow, they become internally dysfunctional and fragmented. In hindsight from the outside, it seems like an obvious problem to avoid, but from the inside, in the thick of it, it is far more the standard than the exception.

Heck, the university IT people I work with are typically re-inventing the wheel about a dozen separate ways across campus because everyone's too busy doing their own job to figure out how to help someone else they never interact with do theirs. You would think upper management would solve this problem, but in large enough organizations, by the time information reaches upper management, it has lost so much detail that they are just focusing on larger strategy and are, of course, unaware of nitty-gritty details. It's simply the nature of large organizations that things get silo'ed, and the communication between silos is rare and at too high of a level to be aware of any nuance or details.

Now it should have been obvious for the D&D team to work with the M:tG team on this, but maybe they did and, again, it was just at a high level of detail of quality vendors, package sizing, InDesign templates, etc. that missed the nuances of making sure to account for humidity when dealing with foil cards.
Yeah, it wouldn't surprise me if they did or they didn't. There are innumerable potential failure points, and it only takes one going wrong.
 





Idk, based on the quality of Magic cards I’ve seen coming out of packs, these look they were made by the MTG team. (And Magic players apparently just eat it up anyway because addiction.)
 


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