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D&D General Dragons of Deceit: Check Out the Dragonlance Novel Cover

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While we've known about the upcoming Dragonlance novel trilogy since October 2020, Margaret Weis has shared the wraparound cover of the first book in the new Dragonlance novel trilogy, Dragons of Deceit and confirmed the release date August 9th 2022.

As we've noted before, Weis & Hickman are using the brand "Classic Dragonlance" which features the older-style title banner.


Previous information indicated that the second book in the trilogy would be called Dragons of Fate.

Tracy Hickman shared some more information, including the book description which was revealed back in November.


It’s official! Dragons of Deceit by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman, published by Del Rey, will be released August 9, 2022. We’re returning to old friends while introducing a new heroine to the classic world of Dragonlance. Our gift to you this holiday season is to share a first look at the cover!

Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman return to the unforgettable world of the New York Times bestselling Dragonlance series as a new heroine—desperate to restore her beloved father to life—sets off on a quest to change time.

Destina Rosethorn—as her name implies—believes herself to be a favored child of destiny. But when her father dies in the War of the Lance, she watches her carefully constructed world come crashing down. Not only does she lose her beloved father but the legacy he has left her: the family lands and castle. To save her father, she hatches a bold plan—to go back in time and prevent his death.

First, she has to secure the Device of Time Journeying, last known to be in the possession of the spirited kender Tasslehoff Burrfoot. But to change time, she needs another magical artifact—the most powerful and dangerous artifact ever created. Destina’s quest takes her from the dwarven kingdom of Thorbardin to the town of Solace and beyond, setting in motion a chain of disastrous events that threaten to divert the course of the River of Time, alter the past, and forever change the future.


Margaret Weis commented on the logo usage -- "We are so pleased that Wizards of the Coast permitted us to use the classic Dragonlance logo from 1984. The logo was designed by the TSR art director at the time, the late James Roslof, and was hand-painted by Larry Elmore."

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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey


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To understand the word "classic," one must first understand the history of Dragonlance. There are three main eras, from a publishing POV.

The classic era is the War of the Lance (WotL) and Legends eras, ending with Dragons of Summer Flame. From a game standpoint, the setting used the AD&D 2e rules.

After Summer Flame, Dragonlance continued with the Fifth Age products. Basically, gods and magic left the world with the end of Summer Flame. The rules changed to the SAGA rules, the timeline jumped ahead 30 years, new magic (read: replacement magic) was found, and gigantic dragon overlords conquered Ansalon, dividing the continent between them. Needless to say, the change in rules and setting caused a rift in Dragonlance fandom.

Weis and Hickman then returned with the War of Souls series, where the gods returned, with the exception of Paladine (Bahamut) and Takhisis (Tiamat). And this is an extremely abbreviated version of events. Dragonlance returned as a D&D setting, and was the first setting launched for D&D 3.5. At this point, it's roughly 70 years after the War of the Lance.

Dragonlance fans have talked quite a bit about whether this new trilogy will be a reboot or not. However it goes, I believe that Weis and Hickman will handle it well.
This is more or less a good summary of what happened both in and out of setting, at least without really getting into the details.

I happen to be one of the fans of the Fifth Age/Age of Mortals. Overall it brought the game into a more updated ruleset and did a great deal to fix a lot of the problems of the early books. The fear I have is that this synopsis screams of a "we're going to reboot this back to a time period where people think they want, even though half the modern rules/races/classes frankly just don't work unless we retcon the setting to a point beyond recognition." But I'll judge the book after I've read it, buy any supplement for the 5e ruleset and just ignore whatever lore I find is stupid.

In my games Paladine is NOT Bahamut and Takhisis is NOT Tiamat (and is dead unless I decide otherwise). I actually like the setup that the War of Souls gave us and have no desire to change it short of progressing the story further. Especially if it means removing half of great potential for factions/political intrigue that adding the Legion of Steel, and Sorcerers vs Wizards conflict over differences in magic added.
 




In my games Paladine is NOT Bahamut and Takhisis is NOT Tiamat (and is dead unless I decide otherwise). I actually like the setup that the War of Souls gave us and have no desire to change it short of progressing the story further. Especially if it means removing half of great potential for factions/political intrigue that adding the Legion of Steel, and Sorcerers vs Wizards conflict over differences in magic added.

If taking all the lore of every edition into account, then Paladine can be both Bahamut AND not Bahamut, and Takhisis can be both Tiamat AND not Tiamat.

This has to do with the quasi-conceptual nature of deity bodies that enables them to produce aspects of themselves separate from the original body, as well as change their forms however they will.

I've divided aspects into two types: convergent and divergent.

Convergent aspects are the usual "avatars" seen when a deity needs to be in two or more places at once, sharing the same consciousness like looking left and right at the same time, created and dispersed as needed.

Divergent aspects are split off from the original body with minds and personalities of their own, which Paladine and Tiamat would fall under.

Examples include Marduk, an aspect of Bahamut with a different alignment and different divine realm, Tymora and Beshaba, created when the body of the goddess Tyche was split in two, and Mystryl, who was created when parts of Selune and Shar were split off and merged into a new deity.

A mystical connection can remain, but Paladine makes decisions separate from Bahamut and does not count against the maximum limit of avatars; the same goes for Takhisis, who actually surpassed the power level of the original Tiamat at least once - further cementing the notion that they are independent for the most part.
 

Way I see it, Paladine and Takhisis are greater deities, and thus by the current Dungeon Master's Guide their avatars are on the level of lesser deities. Their avatars Bahamut and Tiamat have cultivated enough of a separate following and identity of their own that they're able to exist even when the "parent" deities have lost their divinity.

But that's just how it is in my version of the multiverse.
 

vecna00

Speculation Specialist Wizard
A thought that came to mind: Having the old logo and adding "Classic" to it makes me think that maybe we won't be seeing an official Dragonlance setting anytime soon.
 

Dire Bare

Legend
I've played D&D for forty years, and have never read a novel based on one of its settings.

Carry on...
Okay?

Odd thing to post in a thread about the upcoming Dragonlance novel.

I've played D&D for (about) 40 years, and I've read every single D&D novel published . . . . and liked (most of) them!

How about this . . . . I'll read the upcoming Dragons of Deceit, and you don't. Everybody wins!
 

Dire Bare

Legend
Remember that brief period in the very late '80s and very early '90s when Raistlin was to D&D what Drizzt later in the '90s became? Pepperidge Farm remembers.

Also goddamn it Tasslehoff Burrfoot really? REALLY?!
Tasslehoff is a fan fave as well as a favorite of Margaret and Tracy's. Of course he's going to go along for the ride. :)
Some folks in the fandom love to shout their disdain for Tasslehoff from the mountaintops. And Drizzt, and Raistlin . . . . .

And yet, these characters keep reappearing in the fiction. Maybe the complainers don't represent the majority of fans . . . .
 

Some folks in the fandom love to shout their disdain for Tasslehoff from the mountaintops. And Drizzt, and Raistlin . . . . .

And yet, these characters keep reappearing in the fiction. Maybe the complainers don't represent the majority of fans . . . .
Or maybe the authors just don't care lol? Anything is possible! < spreads hands wide >

Raistlin is awesome and I won't have a word said against him. Yes he's a total emo-goth who would definitely wear headphones and glare at people a lot, but that's part of his charm. I also have no real problem with Drizzt except he's boring and overexposed.

But Tasslehoff. That guy... that little... oooh....
 


Dire Bare

Legend
Or maybe the authors just don't care lol? Anything is possible! < spreads hands wide >

Raistlin is awesome and I won't have a word said against him. Yes he's a total emo-goth who would definitely wear headphones and glare at people a lot, but that's part of his charm. I also have no real problem with Drizzt except he's boring and overexposed.

But Tasslehoff. That guy... that little... oooh....
It's cool, of course, if you don't care for TB.

But he doesn't keep reappearing because W&H love him so much they ignore fan feedback. Tas is a popular character. He's in the pantheon of fan-favorite D&D characters.
 

It's cool, of course, if you don't care for TB.

But he doesn't keep reappearing because W&H love him so much they ignore fan feedback. Tas is a popular character. He's in the pantheon of fan-favorite D&D characters.
Personally I love him. Ton of character growth through the series, shows how you can play a kender without being a never ending onslaught of being a jerk player
 

This is what I get for my Dragonlance lore knowledge pretty much dropping off of a cliff after the first three trilogies! Last I heard he had escaped Ravenloft...

He’s currently dead dead. Doesn’t mean they can’t use him though one way or another.

The thing about the iconic D&D characters like Drizzt, Tasslehoff, Elminster, etc., is that love or hate them, they get people talking. I'd be willing to bet if I posted two threads, the one entitled "Gandalf Could Whup Rastlin's Shiny Golden Posterior" would get more responses than the one titled "Quick Ben vs. Ged, Who Would Win?"

That being said, there's also a ton of younger D&D players that don't really give a fig about any of these characters.
 


My question is if we will can see an official opened door for fandom to create their own alternate timelines, for example one where lord Soth travel to the past to kill the king-priest and avoid the Cataclysm, but he doesn't notice his actions allowed other faction of time-travelers to go to the past and to cause the summer of the Chaos. And what if a third faction travels to the past to stop the second group? A time paradox creating a special type of demiplane, the time spheres. Or the gods of Krynn create a special reward for the heroes of the Lance, a "delight domain" (like the one from Withlight) where they are the archfeys. Or an alternate future where the dragon Skies get his goal, Kitiara's soul, and she is reincarnated in a new draconic humanoid body, and later mother of a new generation of spellcales (a race with draconic traits).

The Krynn sphere is relatively easy to be rebooted/retconected, and this can allow to add new elements from the last editions, for example the sorcerers and the warlocks. Maybe a failed attempt of invasion by the Vodoni empire (a faction from Spelljammer) caused a world-shaping event like the Sundering in Forgotten Realms.

How to know the novel is good? When the fandom starts to speculate with theories about wha will happen in the next novels.
 

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