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D&D General Dumb Reasons To Get Booted From a Group.

Damn you Flamestrike! I can't get this image of the count counting the werewolves' body count and his mad laughter on the 10th one with the Blade techno music in the background off of my mind...

10! 10 werewolves! Hahahahahahahah!
And the Blade techno music....

10! 10 werewolves!!!!!

I'll need a psychiatrist for sure now.
I am doomed...
 

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Damn you Flamestrike! I can't get this image of the count counting the werewolves' body count and his mad laughter on the 10th one with the Blade techno music in the background off of my mind...

10! 10 werewolves! Hahahahahahahah!
And the Blade techno music....

10! 10 werewolves!!!!!

I'll need a psychiatrist for sure now.
I am doomed...
It was basically this:


With this song:

 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
The thing I- as an adult fan of horror stories- always liked about The Count is that the counting thing actually goes back to some of the lore.

In some cultures, leaving a trail of rice (as I recall) was a ward against vampire attack. A vampire hunting you would be mystically compelled to count all the grains before attacking. Theoretically, this should buy you enough time to make it to safety.

This was even immortalized in a modern, B-list vampire movie (the name of which I cannot recall). The heroes had captured a powerful vampire, and had him bound in a large lab of sorts to study him. They pointed out that, in the event he broke free, the big red panic button on the wall would open dozens of huge burlap bags of rice for him to count.

Inevitably, the vampire DOES get loose, and one of the characters slams the button. The torrent of falling rice is captured in high-focus, well lit slo-mo. As the heroes scramble towards the door in a near panic, the vampire looks around, then sneers at them, saying (paraphrasing) :

”12, 067, 391, 782, 623 grains of rice.”

…and the slaughter commences.
 


I've seen the inverse of this: a player tempted to "boot" themselves from a group over merely finding out that the DM is a devout Catholic during a one-off session held in person at his house. It really wasn't pretty, and it ended up demonstrating some shockingly hostile views from the OP toward Christianity in general and Catholicism specifically (enough that the thread got locked).
 

I got booted out of a game of Vampire because I knew the rule better than the current story teller... 3 weeks later, that group came to me and asked me to be their story teller. Just said nope, I already had a group of neonates on the go. Irony is a b*tch sometimes.
I had a similar situation, but it was at a convention. I regularly ran the RPG in question (Legend of the Five Rings), so I had a lot of knowledge about the rules and the setting. The other players were newbs, so they quickly decided I was the party's leader, which was important for status situations. While scouting our lord's lands, we saw an invading army. I instructed the group to return to our lord's castle, while I distracted them. The GM was incredulous "you're going to attack?!?" I explained that I'm a samurai, and to die for my lord is the greatest honor.

Things devolved from there. It wasn't long after that the players asked me to take over the game, infuriating the GM. He would have booted me, but convention rules prevented him from doing so. It quickly became apparent that the GM wrote a very linear story arc that we simply sat through. The end was done in such a way that the players had no chance of guessing the solution, and required ex machina to finish the adventure. The players and I had a good time though, mostly because of how much I pissed off the GM by offering solutions not accounted for in his scripted story.
 

CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing
I've never been booted from a gaming group. But I've booted players before.

The latest recipient of my boot was a friend-of-a-friend who wanted to join a D&D game. We were a player short, so I figured, what the heck?

Well, he turned out to be a table captain who wouldn't let other people call their own actions or make their own decisions. If someone moved to a square, he would move them to a different one and explained why. If someone cast a spell, he argued and told them to cast a different one. If they targeted a creature, he argued and told them to target a different one. When I asked the cleric to call their action, he responded instead. And so forth. Everyone was getting really frustrated, and started giving me that "where did you find this guy" look.

So after the first combat scene mercifully ended, I called a break. I took the table guy aside and told him to stop talking down to everyone and let them play however they want. "But they're doing it wrong! I'm helping!" he insisted. I don't remember exactly what I said after that, but basically I told him he could knock it off or leave, and he left.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
I've never been booted from a gaming group. But I've booted players before.

The latest recipient of my boot was a friend-of-a-friend who wanted to join a D&D game. We were a player short, so I figured, what the heck?

Well, he turned out to be a table captain who wouldn't let other people call their own actions or make their own decisions. If someone moved to a square, he would move them to a different one and explained why. If someone cast a spell, he argued and told them to cast a different one. If they targeted a creature, he argued and told them to target a different one. When I asked the cleric to call their action, he responded instead. And so forth. Everyone was getting really frustrated, and started giving me that "where did you find this guy" look.

So after the first combat scene mercifully ended, I called a break. I took the table guy aside and told him to stop talking down to everyone and let them play however they want. "But they're doing it wrong! I'm helping!" he insisted. I don't remember exactly what I said after that, but basically I told him he could knock it off or leave, and he left.
I've never been booted from a gaming group. But I've booted players before.

The latest recipient of my boot was a friend-of-a-friend who wanted to join a D&D game. We were a player short, so I figured, what the heck?

Well, he turned out to be a table captain who wouldn't let other people call their own actions or make their own decisions. If someone moved to a square, he would move them to a different one and explained why. If someone cast a spell, he argued and told them to cast a different one. If they targeted a creature, he argued and told them to target a different one. When I asked the cleric to call their action, he responded instead. And so forth. Everyone was getting really frustrated, and started giving me that "where did you find this guy" look.

So after the first combat scene mercifully ended, I called a break. I took the table guy aside and told him to stop talking down to everyone and let them play however they want. "But they're doing it wrong! I'm helping!" he insisted. I don't remember exactly what I said after that, but basically I told him he could knock it off or leave, and he left.

Fair enough.
 

The thing I- as an adult fan of horror stories- always liked about The Count is that the counting thing actually goes back to some of the lore.

In some cultures, leaving a trail of rice (as I recall) was a ward against vampire attack. A vampire hunting you would be mystically compelled to count all the grains before attacking. Theoretically, this should buy you enough time to make it to safety.

This was even immortalized in a modern, B-list vampire movie (the name of which I cannot recall). The heroes had captured a powerful vampire, and had him bound in a large lab of sorts to study him. They pointed out that, in the event he broke free, the big red panic button on the wall would open dozens of huge burlap bags of rice for him to count.

Inevitably, the vampire DOES get loose, and one of the characters slams the button. The torrent of falling rice is captured in high-focus, well lit slo-mo. As the heroes scramble towards the door in a near panic, the vampire looks around, then sneers at them, saying (paraphrasing) :

”12, 067, 391, 782, 623 grains of rice.”

…and the slaughter commences.
Wasn't it the Leprechaun horror movie? I thought it was a fey thing to count spilled things. But I maybe wrong and I am not near my computer to check it up. And I think I saw this in a Supernatural episode too and it too involved fees.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Wasn't it the Leprechaun horror movie? I thought it was a fey thing to count spilled things. But I maybe wrong and I am not near my computer to check it up. And I think I saw this in a Supernatural episode too and it too involved fees.
Nah, not part of that franchise. I stumbled into the middle of it as part of a vampire movie marathon.

The vampiric counting thing is mentioned in the Wiki:

Depending on the story, vampires may have some or all of these characteristics:

  • They cannot go out in sunlight, so they sleep during the day.
  • They can only be killed in certain ways:
    • being beheaded
    • having a stake driven through their heart
    • or being sprayed or washed with vervain
    • being set on fire
  • They can be weakened by crosses or other religious symbols, garlic, holy water, and silver.
  • They cannot cross the ocean unless they are in a coffin surrounded by soil from their homeland.
  • If vampires click their fingers they can disappear in the blink of an eye.
  • If a bag of rice, grain, seeds or other similar substance is spilled on the ground, a vampire will have to count every grain.
  • They have no reflection in glass, mirrors, or other things.
  • Vampires have photographic memory.
  • Vampires are cold blooded, if once they touch the wound will go.
(Emphasis mine.)
 

Marc_C

Solo Role Playing
After agreeing to a campaign concept the players suddenly decided they didn't want me as their DM because they couldn't do what they wanted. When asked what they wanted to do they were very vague. Next session they didn't show up.

Four months later I learned they had played with another DM and realized they had a good thing going with me. They wanted to come back to my table. I continued the campaign as if nothing happened. Over next months I discovered who was behind that failed coup and booted him out of the group. We played for several years after that without any problems.
 



aco175

Legend
Well, he turned out to be a table captain who wouldn't let other people call their own actions or make their own decisions. If someone moved to a square, he would move them to a different one and explained why. If someone cast a spell, he argued and told them to cast a different one. If they targeted a creature, he argued and told them to target a different one. When I asked the cleric to call their action, he responded instead. And so forth. Everyone was getting really frustrated, and started giving me that "where did you find this guy" look.
We had a guy at a convention try to do this when I was a kid. My father, brother and myself were kind of new and it may have been out first convention, but I remember the DM handling it right away when I told him that is not what my guy would do. My father made sure we did not sit with that guy for the game. I do not think the player was really knowing what he was doing and may thought he was 'helping'. He was telling the DM what everyone would do once combat started or when walking up to a door instead of asking the players if their PC would check or flank or something.
 

Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
The only time I may have been booted from a campaign (maybe, not sure if they had more than one session) was because the dog didn't like me. The dog apparently randomly liked some people and not others and the DM's girlfriend (and dog owner) was convinced that it meant that the dog was "a good judge of character" after greeting them for 2 seconds.

I mean seriously. I know I'm an ***hole, but how could the dog know that quick? :(
 

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
The only time I may have been booted from a campaign (maybe, not sure if they had more than one session) was because the dog didn't like me. The dog apparently randomly liked some people and not others and the DM's girlfriend (and dog owner) was convinced that it meant that the dog was "a good judge of character" after greeting them for 2 seconds.

I mean seriously. I know I'm an ***hole, but how could the dog know that quick? :(

It might involve sloppy steaks.

 

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen
I'm comfortable being a jerk to sleazy DM's who groom their female players to play out weird sexual vampire fantasies with them.

I wasn't going to go along with it, and (sadly) we were relying on a friend to pick us up so we were stuck there.

The only person I legit felt bad for was the girl that invited us, but after further discussions with her, it turned out my initial read of the group (and the DM) was absolutely spot on.

Turns out we did her a solid.
If someone’s being a creep, you don’t act like a tool in-character, you call them out for being a creep in real life. You don’t solve out-of-game problems with in-game actions, that’s RPG etiquette 101.
 

Dausuul

Legend
Wasn't it the Leprechaun horror movie? I thought it was a fey thing to count spilled things. But I maybe wrong and I am not near my computer to check it up. And I think I saw this in a Supernatural episode too and it too involved fees.
From what I've seen, the distinction between undead and fey in folklore is extremely fuzzy.

In fact, the distinctions between anything in folklore are pretty fuzzy. The critters don't get sorted into neat scientific taxonomies*. Everything is sui generis.

*Come to think of it, scientific taxonomies are rarely neat either. The universe is a big, messy, complicated place.
 

el-remmen

Moderator Emeritus
Decades ago now, I joined a game in process and soon discovered that the good elven wizard I had rolled up was in a band of neutral and evil characters of the type that were like "Half-ogres have enmity against dwarves so I start smashing the skulls of the dwarven captives." This was way before the days of session 0 or even warning people what they were getting into and was very much a "that's what my character would do" kind of situation. Well, my character would intervene, so that is what I had her do.

The session ended and a couple of weeks after I found out they had scheduled and played the next session without me b/c the half-ogre player didn't like me trying to stop him. But that was fine, because I didn't want to play in that kind of game anyway.
 

We were talking about game mechanics and our characters on discord after the session 0, with a tangent about how feudalism worked and how that differed from the domain management rules in the Rules Cyclopedia. While I was AFK, I was banned from the discord and removed from the roll20 group. DM claimed that I was a rules lawyer and backseat DM, and other players had quit the group because of me.

Only thing I can really think of is that one of the other players was trying to convince me I didn't need to save up gold for a pike, because I could fight from the second rank with a spear, and his character did it all the time in another group. I disagreed and said spears don't work like that in BECMI, and even if the DM wanted to allow it, I wasn't interested in exploiting that advantage for my character.
 

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