• Welcome to this new upgrade of the site. We are now on a totally different software platform. Many things will be different, and bugs are expected. Certain areas (like downloads and reviews) will take longer to import. As always, please use the Meta Forum for site queries or bug reports. Note that we (the mods and admins) are also learning the new software.
  • The RSS feed for the news page has changed. Use this link. The old one displays the forums, not the news.

Favorite things about your favorite edition: MECHANICS/RULES ONLY

Quartz

Explorer
1E/2E: THACO
3E: There's just so much to love. The rules brought unified orthogonality and simple mathematical order. Multiclassing done right. Prestige classes. Feats. Epic spellcasting.
4E: didn't play, but liked AEDU.
5E: Advantage / Disadvantage and bounded accuracy.
 

Aldarc

Explorer
4e:
* The WARLORD
* Power Sources and Class Roles: This led to 4e having the gumption and vision to pull the trigger on something that not even 2e could commit to doing : removing all divine magic classes from Dark Sun.
* Class parity and balance
* Scene/narrative-based mechanics (AEDU)
* Martial classes had interesting and thematic tactical choices that were typically privileged to magic classes.
* Monster design: minions, monster roles, cool monster mechanics, etc.
* Tiers of play including epic destinies
* Saves as defenses
* Rituals
 

jasper

Rotten DM
Save or Die!
Save or Die!
Save or Die!
Save or Die!
Save or Die!
Save or Die!
Save or Die!
RULES.
 

oreofox

Explorer
2e: wizards having a d4 hit die. So many strange and different monsters (none of this "Orc Eye of Gruumsh" or "Water Elemental Drowner" that's been going on since 3rd's MM4 or MM5). Ability Scores doing more than just giving you a higher +. Exceptional Strength. (I unfortunately didn't get to play much of this, as I didn't get into it until a year or two before 3e was released).

3e: skills + skill points. Feats. Sorcerer. Barbarian, monk. Alignment actually meaning something. In a way, positive AC. Feat and ability score increases based on character level, and not class level. Cantrips. Codified way for players to craft magic items. Just about everything about Eberron.

Pathfinder: Many of the classes. Paizo actually supporting new classes with future books instead of publishing and forgetting they existed (like WotC did numerous times). Cleric's Channel Energy. CMD/CMB. A lot of their races. Animal companions. Druid Wild Shape.

5e: Subraces, subclasses/archetypes (whatever you wanna call them). More reasonable numbers for attack and defense. Advantage/disadvantage. Infinite cantrips. Spell memorization being divorced from spell slots. Sorcerer and Wizard spell lists being different.

Those are all I can think of off the top of my head so late at night
 

Gladius Legis

Explorer
5e:
- Advantage/disadvantage.
- Bounded accuracy.
- Alignment back to the classic 9, but alignment-based mechanics de-emphasized.
- The Paladin actually doesn't suck this time.
- Proficiency bonus.
- Spellcasting DC scaling via proficiency bonus.
- Neo-vancian spellcasting. Upcasting with higher slots to make spells stronger.
- Multiclass spellcasting and half-caster (Paladin, Ranger) spellcasting actually being effective at higher levels as a result of the two above things.
- Concentration mechanic in general (though I'd make a couple of changes to it).
 

Fanaelialae

Adventurer
BECMI / Rules Cyclopedia
Weapon Specialization: each weapon had its own progression that was appropriately themed to that weapon

4e
Defenders: while you could do the job in earlier editions, 4e gave you the tools to make it fun and engaging
Monster Design and other DMing "quality of life" improvements

5e
Bounded Accuracy
Advantage/Disadvantage
 

Garthanos

Arcadian Knight
4e:
* The WARLORD
* Power Sources and Class Roles: This led to 4e having the gumption and vision to pull the trigger on something that not even 2e could commit to doing : removing all divine magic classes from Dark Sun.
* Class parity and balance
* Scene/narrative-based mechanics (AEDU)
* Martial classes had interesting and thematic tactical choices that were typically privileged to magic classes.
* Monster design: minions, monster roles, cool monster mechanics, etc.
* Tiers of play including epic destinies
* Saves as defenses
* Rituals
The fighter finally having the ability to actually defend could probably be mentioned (I know its in roles but this and warlord are two archetypes which were never mechanically fulfilled til 4e).

However for me its pretty much mechanically everything with the above being just the iceberg tip and its almost easier to mention things I didn't like
 
Last edited:

Saelorn

Explorer
I don't have a favorite thing about my favorite edition, at least when it comes to mechanics. Strangely enough, every good thing about 2E has been done better by another edition. The thing I like most about 2E is that it doesn't have some of the deal-breaker bad mechanics from other editions.

Instead, I'll give you my favorite thing about my least favorite edition: I really like the multi-class rules in 4E. It's not something that could be done in a game with less-universal class resources, but it really made you feel like a meaningful member of your second class, as soon as you picked up your first power. Your fighter may only be casting three magic missiles and one fireball over the course of a day, but when it comes to casting those spells, you're (almost) every bit as strong as you need to be in order to stay relevant.
 

oreofox

Explorer
Saelorn made me think of something I really like in 4e (despite not caring for the edition itself just from cursory glances at the first PHB): Minions. I wish it would have been brought over into 5e. But, since I am the DM, I did bring them over. Couple those with the "cleave through monsters" optional rule in the DMG, it makes the melee types feel badass being able to mow down multiple enemies in a similar way to the spellcasters (though, up close instead of far away).
 

Tallifer

Villager
4E: The whole system was transparent and logical when I read the first few pages of rules: everything else just followed from those rules by extension or exception

rôles
powers for everyone
power cards
paragon paths and epic destinies
expected wealth/residuum/everything about the treasure system
monsters and NPCs not built as characters: easy to create and run
 

Tony Vargas

Adventurer
Saelorn made me think of something I really like in 4e (despite not caring for the edition itself just from cursory glances at the first PHB): Minions. I wish it would have been brought over into 5e. But, since I am the DM, I did bring them over.
The difference between a 4e minion and just a very under-level 5e monster is mainly that the minion has a chance of surviving AEs ('missed' attack never damages a minion - in 5e, it'd be "minions are never killed by damage taken in spite of succeeding on a saving throw"), and that it's hitting closer to even money vs just-barely-enough-to-be-relevant under BA.
 

Ath-kethin

Explorer
2e
- Kits - yeah, I know, many were unevenly designed, but I submit the idea was still a good one and Al-Qadim put them to fabulous use
You might be interested in some of our stuff. We introduced the concept of character kits in Midnight in the City of Brass, which you can check out HERE, with a free preview available HERE.

We also have a free document discussing some of our design choices and approaches (particularly to our interpretation of the sha'ir, which is one of the kits we included above) available HERE.

After long discussion, we determined that there was definitely a design space in 5e for something similar to backgrounds, but with prerequisites. Unlike subclasses, our kits do not require a character to belong to a certain class, though with some of the skill requirements some classes will have an easier time meeting the criteria than others. But ultimately our kits are designed to give a minor mechanical boost to a roleplaying feature, and as such should not overpower a character who takes one vs. a character who does not.

We will be releasing Adventures in the Land of Fate, a more comprehensive Al-Qadim resource, later this summer, which will have some additional kits in it. This book will be 50+ pages and we will offer it Pay What You Want.

All of those links above go to our product pages on DMSGuild.
 

oreofox

Explorer
The difference between a 4e minion and just a very under-level 5e monster is mainly that the minion has a chance of surviving AEs ('missed' attack never damages a minion - in 5e, it'd be "minions are never killed by damage taken in spite of succeeding on a saving throw"), and that it's hitting closer to even money vs just-barely-enough-to-be-relevant under BA.
Then a special quality of the "minion" descriptor would be Evasion. They take no damage on a successful saving throw, and half damage on a failed one. Half-damage is still more than enough to kill them anyway.
 

doctorbadwolf

Explorer
Gonna start with favorite things about an edition I don’t like overall.

3.5. Bard Songs. I want to sing a song, or chant, or yell a battle cry, and all my allies who can hear me benefit.

4e. The Assassin Class. Built from the ground up to be a mystic shadow death dealer. Needed a numbers errata for its powers, but even so it was just so damn fun to play. The Executioner was also quite fun.
Rituals. 5e rituals are fun, but there is still room for spells that can only be cast as a ritual, and don’t mess around with spell slots. Rituals were rad.
Alchemy. The wide range of items, learning formulas the same way rituals were learned, the mechanics of them (for the most part), all of it.
AEDU. I wanted more utility powers and I wish Skill Powers had been in from the jump, and I wish every class just used its main stat for Basic Attacks without needing a feat, but goodness I loved Powers.
Themes/Paragon Paths/Epic Destinies. IMO they are prestige classes brought to the full fruition of their potential. Sat alongside class, rather than replacing it, it’s just good. Great story additions, fun ways to add weird to a character, just one the best things in any edition.
Rules consistency. I had a handle on the rules after a few sessions, and could generally guess at how to rule something, and end up within a stones throw of “correct” most of the time.
Balance that made making stuff up not break the game, and even the “broken” options weren’t actually broken.
Bards, Monks, Shamans, Artificer, Seeker, Avenger, Warlock, were all so juicy!
Nearly all the Essentials class variants, and especially so many of the utility powers they added to the game.
All the races, and how races were built.
Skill challenges.
How skills worked, how nearly every skill (maybe not Streetwise, but all the others I think) had some level of combat usage, as well as being important to out of combat scenes.
The way skill challenges could be run as part of a combat scene.
Martial Practices.
Inherent Bonuses. Magic items not required, but also a character with tons of them, and one with none, could reasonably be in the same party without one outshining the other.
Purpose built options as a basic design paradigm.
Monster/encounter design. Could rave for days on how good it is.
probably more I can’t think of right now!

5e
Bounded Accuracy.
Spell slots and upcasting.
Rogues.
Paladins. Only edition where I wanted to play one.
Most or the classes are fun and satisfying.
Tools, especially with Xanather’s out
Backgrounds. Liked them in 4e, love seeing them reach their potential in 5e. I hope we see more backgrounds like the Ravnica ones eventually.
Quick and easy design, simple to learn.
Other atuff! I’m sleepy!
 

oreofox

Explorer
That'd work for a lot of 'em. There's 5 other saves but rarely for 1/2....
...does 5e also have Mettle, I wonder?
Most damaging spells typically call for a Dexterity save. Constitution sometimes does (usually for poison or some sort of gas attack), and Intelligence (very rare), typically for psychic damage. I guess a better thing would be to create something like "Minion's Luck" (a better name escapes me so late at night for me), giving minions the effects of Evasion, but for every damaging attack that requires a save. I don't know. Whatever. My brain is not wanting to function this late.
 

Fanaelialae

Adventurer
The difference between a 4e minion and just a very under-level 5e monster is mainly that the minion has a chance of surviving AEs ('missed' attack never damages a minion - in 5e, it'd be "minions are never killed by damage taken in spite of succeeding on a saving throw"), and that it's hitting closer to even money vs just-barely-enough-to-be-relevant under BA.
The other big difference is that minions dealt enough damage and have sufficient attack bonus to make them scary. Albeit, Bounded Accuracy more or less handles the attack bonus part.

Sure, you could use a kobold as a 5e "minion" against a high level party, but the damage from that kobold will be piddly at best. Even in vast numbers, they won't have the threat that comes from a proper 4e style minion.

IMO, to properly implement the concept of a minion, you give them 1 HP. Up their damage (and possibly attack bonus) to the point where they are threatening. Additionally, they negate any damage taken after making a successful save.

Veering into house rules for a moment, I've been toying with the idea of having minions who avoid damage by making a successful save fall prone. This helps to avoid the odd Rambo minion who just keeps making saves and refuses to die. (The idea is that they can't use their damage negation when already prone.)
 

Advertisement

Top