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It is time to forgive WOTC and get back onboard.


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Micah Sweet

Level Up & OSR Enthusiast
Keeping the new system closed would not be worth an angry reaction, but it would make the new edition less interesting than the existing edition and reduce the amount of support it gets, which will reduce the amount of money it makes. How significant that will be is hard to say, but I don't see a way for them to make more money that way.
I'm starting to feel WotC actively wants the game to be less interesting.
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
Supporter
I disagree. WotC got into the house, we just happened to bump into them while they were rifling through the belongings.

Breaking into a house is, itself, a crime.
WotC did not commit any crimes.
They did something that made people upset? Sure. That gave people anxiety about the future? Yep.
But no crime. No actual violations of anyone's property or rights occurred.
 

Micah Sweet

Level Up & OSR Enthusiast
All these analogies to crime when no actual crime happened.

The person walking down the street considered breaking into the house, but when the neighborhood watch came around the corner, thought better of it and left.
Except they told us about the crime they were going to commit, and explained how they were going to do it to the people they in-writing intended to rob.

Metaphorically, of course.
 

I disagree. WotC got into the house, we just happened to bump into them while they were rifling through the belongings.

At that point, we could have been in trouble, because they could just kill us...
they however said sorry for disturbing your night sleep. I clean up your room. And while at it I also put the papers on your desk in theappropriate folder and I put a high security lock into your door, the old one was too easy to pick.
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
Supporter
Except they told us about the crime they were going to commit, and explained how they were going to do it to the people they in-writing intended to rob.

Metaphorically, of course.

I mean, the metaphor has the problem that there is no agreement that it would actually be illegal - the opinions of duffers on the internet are not the law, and there was no consensus among the legal experts among us.

Would it have been a jerk move? Yes, sure. Would it have caused financial harm? Probably. But that doesn't make crime a fitting metaphor.

But, let us put that aside. There's a Golden Rule question here:

Would you want to be held to task for things that you thought about, and even at one time intended, but didn't actually do?

Getting kind of thoughtcrimey there, isn't it?
 


Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
Except they told us about the crime they were going to commit, and explained how they were going to do it to the people they in-writing intended to rob.

Metaphorically, of course.

On the one hand, at least we've toned down the metaphor from- "Hasbro was going to murder you. MURDER YOU!" to mere burglary.

On the other hand, is there some award given out for over-the-top metaphors? 'Cuz if there is, I'd like to put in an entry.

It's just like if Hasbro was going to kill and eat your entire family in front of you, and then paper cut you to death ... but stopped because someone convinced them that they would lose their vegetarian bona fides if they went through with it!
 

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