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D&D Movie/TV Michelle Rodriguez, Justice Smith Join D&D Movie

From Comic Book Movies -- "Michelle Rodriguez (Avatar) and Justice Smith (Detective Pikachu) have joined Wonder Woman 1984's Chris Pine in Paramount and eOne's upcoming big-budget board game adaptation, Dungeons & Dragons..."

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We learned in December about Chris Pine's involvement, along with directors Jonathan Goldstein and John Francis Daley.

 

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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey


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Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
I think an Eberron campaign would just need a quick intro to explain it. A brief montage of the last war, some aerial pictures of a city with magi-tech trains and so on.

I think it could be kind of cool, but I also don't think it matters a whole [edit] long [/edit] lot.
 
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payn

Adventurer
I dont think any intro explanation is necessary. Show it by have things happening. GotG has Peter losing his mom, gets abducted by a spaceship. Sad and oh we are in space now. Next scene is a Mcguffin hunt followed by a fight over the McGuffin and yadda yadda. Still dont know S#^T about the world, but who cares? Whats happening right in front of us is interesting, sad, fun, and exciting!
 

Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
I dont think any intro explanation is necessary. Show it by have things happening. GotG has Peter losing his mom, gets abducted by a spaceship. Sad and oh we are in space now. Next scene is a Mcguffin hunt followed by a fight over the McGuffin and yadda yadda. Still dont know S#^T about the world, but who cares? Whats happening right in front of us is interesting, sad, fun, and exciting!

For non-D&D folks explaining things like how magic trains are a thing could use some explanation. Being abducted by a spaceship is a pretty common trope, warforged are not. I think if the setting matters (it doesn't really need to) an intro scene would help.

Besides, having scenes of a warforged being created could be kind of cool.
 

ART!

Hero
I dont think any intro explanation is necessary. Show it by have things happening. GotG has Peter losing his mom, gets abducted by a spaceship. Sad and oh we are in space now. Next scene is a Mcguffin hunt followed by a fight over the McGuffin and yadda yadda. Still dont know S#^T about the world, but who cares? Whats happening right in front of us is interesting, sad, fun, and exciting!
This is a good point - you can get by with very little actual explanation and even some very dumb things if your storytelling is really engaging, if the ride is thrilling, if the dramatic or emotional momentum doesn't allow much time to question things.

See: J.J. Abrams. ;)
 

ART!

Hero
For non-D&D folks explaining things like how magic trains are a thing could use some explanation. Being abducted by a spaceship is a pretty common trope, warforged are not. I think if the setting matters (it doesn't really need to) an intro scene would help.

Besides, having scenes of a warforged being created could be kind of cool.
Theoretically, you could get by with just:

Earlier in movie: ""War-forged'? Pff - some kind of fairy-tale magic...construct...battle machines? Nonsense."

Later in movie, after warforged show up: "Okay: not a fairy-tale! Run!"

But, you know, better written. ;)
 

Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
Theoretically, you could get by with just:

Earlier in movie: ""War-forged'? Pff - some kind of fairy-tale magic...construct...battle machines? Nonsense."

Later in movie, after warforged show up: "Okay: not a fairy-tale! Run!"

But, you know, better written. ;)
If it's Eberron, warforged are well known.

But don't sell yourself short, your vignette was terrifying. 👻
 

Dire Bare

Legend
Supporter
Folks are way overestimating impact of setting on this upcoming D&D film. There has been mention of using Guardians of the Galaxy as a template. What do you know about the setting of that world? Not much really. There are aliens and a group of thieves called ravagers but what else? It was a character driven ensemble filck. We know some rather impactful background elements of each character but nothing indepth. Racoon was built in a lab for some reason. Why? Nobody cares. Groot is some tree being. Where is he from what's his people like? Nobody cares.

You also have to look at the writers. They make their bread and butter on character driven ensemble flicks. The background setting is paper thin in all their movies. Dont think we should expect any different here.
Agreed.

Setting can be an important "character" in a fantasy or sci-fi story . . . but it doesn't have to be, and it often isn't.
 

payn

Adventurer
For non-D&D folks explaining things like how magic trains are a thing could use some explanation. Being abducted by a spaceship is a pretty common trope, warforged are not. I think if the setting matters (it doesn't really need to) an intro scene would help.
I dont think so. As long as something interesting is happening on a magic train, thats all folks need. World building and setting importance are things of series. Movies are for non-stop fun and action while you pop your corn.

Besides, having scenes of a warforged being created could be kind of cool.

Gotta admit, that would be pretty awesome!
 

ART!

Hero
If it's Eberron, warforged are well known.

But don't sell yourself short, your vignette was terrifying. 👻
Well, yeah - if the setting is Eberron, then you establish all that. Groovy.

I was just saying if you wanted to drop something very much not LOTR or GoT, you just need a little something to let the audience know what to expect, but it doesn't require much. Heck, that's a lot of what trailers are for: "This is like LOTR and GoT! [show elves and evil undead dudes and stuff] But with fireballs! [show fireball being cast] And magic robots! [show warforged busting through a wall]"
 


Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
Well, yeah - if the setting is Eberron, then you establish all that. Groovy.

I was just saying if you wanted to drop something very much not LOTR or GoT, you just need a little something to let the audience know what to expect, but it doesn't require much. Heck, that's a lot of what trailers are for: "This is like LOTR and GoT! [show elves and evil undead dudes and stuff] But with fireballs! [show fireball being cast] And magic robots! [show warforged busting through a wall]"
Yeah, there are a lot of D&D specific monsters that could set it apart. Mindflayers and other aberrations come to mind as well.
 

ART!

Hero
Yeah, there are a lot of D&D specific monsters that could set it apart. Mindflayers and other aberrations come to mind as well.
Definitely. I keep thinking they really need to have a beholder in this movie, because it's such a D&D thing.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
YUP.
Look up the inital reviews for movies like ALIEN, BLADE RUNNER, THE THING (1982), STAR WARS and CITIZEN KANE.
While there are one or two reviewers that have similar tastes to me and that I trust? Most reviewers have a barely hidden contempt for ANY type of genre film, specifically Horror, sci-fi, fantasy, superheroes, etc. So I've learned to ignore most reviewers.

This really hit home as a regular viewer of AT THE MOVIES with Siskel and Ebert. They often panned movies that I'd seen and loved. I think I finally gave up on them with their review of DIE HARD. Ebert gave it a two star review mostly because he thought the Paul Gleason character (Dwayne T. Robinson) was annoying. Ebert while a well known and popular film critic was also like most film critics, a snob.
Yeah, like the Legend reviews are just asinine. The acting is spot on, the visuals are gorgeous, the creatures are evocative, the tone of the movie is perfect in it's evocation of fairy tale and the beauty and terrible danger of the magical and fey, it's just an absolute treasure of a movie, that because it's weird and earnest and didn't have cute muppets in it, got panned, and snobs like to hate on it.
C'mon people. When I hear "magic trains", my first thought is the Final Fantasy video games, not D&D.

For non-D&D folks explaining things like how magic trains are a thing could use some explanation. Being abducted by a spaceship is a pretty common trope, warforged are not. I think if the setting matters (it doesn't really need to) an intro scene would help.

Besides, having scenes of a warforged being created could be kind of cool.
You could have such a scene, but it's no more needed in Eberron than in FR. Hell, the FOTR movie didn't need it, it just kicked enough ass that it stayed in, rather than explaining the history over several scenes where Aragorn or Gandalf or Elrond gives context to some history, and it made scenes like Boromir's first meeting with Aragorn more immediately poignant, because you have already had a chance to attach meaning to the sword and the heirs of the guy who wielded it against Sauron before that scene comes up. So, it adds to the movie, and it works really well because it's so bloody good, but it wasn't necessary for the movie to work .

But Eberron needs even less than FoTR did. Nothing about a magic train needs any explanation whatsoever. At most, use a moving shot to visually tell the viewer how the train works, showing lightning streaking along between the magic glowing stones underneath the train, and the bottom of the train.

As for warforged, don't give them robotic voices, make it visually clear that they are made of living wood (ie show the wood moving like Groot when they move), and just let them be some scenes with people reacting to them appropriately. Done.

As for the last war, the whole setting is defined by it, and the main character or at least some of the side characters should have a history in it, which is already a narrative Americans and really everyone is quite familiar with in film, and if you really want to explain the Last War, give someone a war-related nightmare and make the main character a scruffy merc from Cyre. Or an agent of Prince Orgev.

But Eberron is still a classic fantasy world, with knights, wizards, priests, witches, curses, dragons, demons, and things which cannot be understood by mortal minds.

I don't think any modern audience needs "lotr meets indiana jones meets guardians of the galaxy" explained to them.
 


doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
There isn't any non-D&D player who thinks "trains" when they hear "Dungeons & Dragons".
completely irrelevant. There also isn't any non dnd player who thinks of mindflayers, beholders, clerics, or anything else wholly specific to dnd when they think of dnd.

Magic trains are...a really small step, my dude. No modern audience is going to be confused by it.

edit: Further, you claimed it would be "Bright 2", which you haven't defended, and is just appealingly absurd to claim.

Most DnD players, and people who watch dnd but don't play it, are familiar with a the idea that dnd isn't lord of the rings, and even people who aren't familiar with that fact...won't mistake a world with castles and knights on horseback and wizards with staves and a total lack of guns or gunlike weapons set in a world that combines the social and political landscape of the renaissance with arcane science providing public facing services equivalent to maybe the 1800's, at the latest, with a film set in the 21st century, complete with gas powered cars and semi-automatic pistols and cell phones.
 
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Yeah, like the Legend reviews are just asinine. The acting is spot on, the visuals are gorgeous, the creatures are evocative, the tone of the movie is perfect in it's evocation of fairy tale and the beauty and terrible danger of the magical and fey....
And let's not forget the awesome Tangerine Dream soundtrack as well. And, if memory serves, that was Tom Cruise's first time as the male lead in a movie.

Johnathan
 

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