D&D General One Piece of Art IX (Wildcard)- What NON-D&D Art Inspired You to Love D&D?

Apologies for a second bite at the cherry but I can’t help thinking that the piece of non-D&D art below has had a pretty significant role in our wonderful game.........

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I'm not familiar with this particular picture, but I'm guessing that's Smaug? That's a good pick. The Hobbit was the first fantasy anything I can remember interacting with. I think I was in the 4th or 5th grade? It was a long time ago, my memory is really hazy. The Hobbit definately had a large impact on my love of fantasy. I can't say any of the artwork itself really stuck with me. Later on in the 6th grade when I read the Lord of the Rings some of the art there really impressed me. Most people focused on the art of people, for me it was the backgrounds and environments that stuck with me. I stuggle to remember any specific piece though. Since you brought it up I'll go looking through my old books and see if I can find one I remember really connecting with.

Edit:

Nope, more faulty memory. My old books were cheap paperbacks that didn't have any art other than the covers. Two of the three books don't even have their cover anymore. I read those books multiple times and they're falling apart. I was probably mixing up some of my old memories of being enthralled with the world with art from later editions I've bought, or maybe the movie concept art. They did have the maps printed in them. I do remember looking at those and tracing the path of the Fellowship through the story. Thinking about what else was going on in world. Tolkien was massively influential on me because of the printed word, not the art. There are tons of great art out there of course, they just weren't very influential to me.
 
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GuyBoy

Hero
I'm not familiar with this particular picture, but I'm guessing that's Smaug? That's a good pick. The Hobbit was the first fantasy anything I can remember reading. I think I was in the 4th or 5th grade? It was a long time ago, my memory is really hazy. The Hobbit definately had a large impact on my love of fantasy. I can't say any of the artwork itself really stuck with me. Later on in the 6th grade when I read the Lord of the Rings some of the art there really impressed me. Most people focused on the art of people, for me it was the backgrounds and environments that stuck with me. I stuggle to remember any specific piece though. Since you brought it up I'll go looking through my old books and see if I can find one I remember really connecting with.

Edit:

Nope, more faulty memory. My old books were cheap paperbacks that didn't have any art other than the covers. Two of the three books don't even have their cover anymore. I read those books multiple times and they're falling apart. I was probably mixing up some of my old memories of being enthralled with the world with art from later editions I've bought, or maybe the movie concept art. They did have the maps printed in them. I do remember looking at those and tracing the path of the Fellowship through the story. Thinking about what else was going on in world. Tolkien was massively influential on me because of the printed word, not the art. There are tons of great art out there of course, they just weren't very influential to me.
It is Smaug. The artist was Tolkien himself, so it carries that little bit of extra resonance.
 

ephemeron

Explorer
Apologies for a second bite at the cherry but I can’t help thinking that the piece of non-D&D art below has had a pretty significant role in our wonderful game.........
And this related image that really captured my young imagination:
J.R.R._Tolkien_-_Thror's_map.jpg
 

Argyle King

Legend
I had to think about this more than I expected.

When I was young, I read the Dragonlance books -without knowing they were D&D. So, they would have been early influences on me (along with The Hobbit and The Chronicles of Narnia). However, Dragonlance is D&D, so that don't count.

I also grew up within reasonable driving distance of where Frank Frazetta was located, but his influence on me would have come later.

I wanted to post something from Riddlemaster of Hed or the Lonewolf series. But, ultimately, I think one of the biggest early influences on me was this:

Ghosts & Goblins

GhostsnGoblinsL1-A1-01.png
 
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Levistus's_Leviathan

5e Freelancer
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Source: The Book of Three by Lloyd Alexander (of the Chronicles of Prydain)
Artist: Jean-Leon Huens
Explanation: I got into the Chronicles of Prydain in the 3rd grade of elementary school, being the first "classic fantasy" book that I ever read on my own (my mother read the Chronicles of Narnia and Harry Potter books to me before I was old enough to read on my own, though). I fell in love with classic fantasy tales and this book helped me expand into other fantasy books. If I had to name a single book that set me on the path to fall in love with D&D, it would probably be this one, even though there are other books and shows that influence my current campaigns far more than the Chronicles of Prydain does.
 

J.Quondam

CR 1/8
View attachment 260064
Source: The Book of Three by Lloyd Alexander (of the Chronicles of Prydain)
Artist: Jean-Leon Huens
Explanation: I got into the Chronicles of Prydain in the 3rd grade of elementary school, being the first "classic fantasy" book that I ever read on my own (my mother read the Chronicles of Narnia and Harry Potter books to me before I was old enough to read on my own, though). I fell in love with classic fantasy tales and this book helped me expand into other fantasy books. If I had to name a single book that set me on the path to fall in love with D&D, it would probably be this one, even though there are other books and shows that influence my current campaigns far more than the Chronicles of Prydain does.
I came ---->this<---- close to choosing this exact image, and for very similar reasons.
 


Hussar

Legend
This probably had as much impact on my D&D as anything, although, to be fair, Lloyd Alexander would easily take this spot as well:

1662169631197.png

Source: Swords of the Horse Clans
Artist: Ken Kelly (1981)

The combination of SF and fantasy has always been strongly ingrained into my brain about how D&D should work. The series has been a huge impact and is probably one of the bigger influences in the post-apocalyptic fantasy genre. Hmm.... I should hunt these down and reread them, but, I'm afraid I'd probably not like them as much as I did at ten or twelve years old.
 



I had to think about this more than I expected.

When I was young, I read the Dragonlance books -without knowing they were D&D. So, they would have been early influences on me (along with The Hobbit and The Chronicles of Narnia). However, Dragonlance is D&D, so that don't count.

I also grew up within reasonable driving distance of where Frank Frazetta was located, but his influence on me would have come later.

I wanted to post something from Riddlemaster of Hed or the Lonewolf series. But, ultimately, I think one of the biggest early influences on me was this:

Ghosts & Goblins

View attachment 260050

Now you got me thinking about video games influence on me. There are so many to chose from, but for inspiring the spirit of adventure nothing beats the Legend of Zelda. The First game in the series I played was A Link to the Past. My love of exploration probably started here. Exploring every nook and cranny of the world looking for new NPC's, artifacts, and power ups. If I had to pick a single moment with the most artist merit from the game it would this:


The mysterious ambiance of the Lost Woods, the clearing where the Master Sword rests, the mist clearing when you pull the sword and the heroic overworld theme playing afterwards. Just chef's kiss. :love:
 


Radaceus

Explorer
I think it was both* of these I bought in the summer of 1979/1980 that turned my attention to the Red Box further down the aisle:

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*I realize it is two pieces of art, but they are intertwined as one in the menage le trois that became my obsession with D&D,

a few short years later and my love deepened, as a new artist cover appeared on the shelf next to where the first two had seduced me from:
1662238169212.png
 

Argyle King

Legend
Now you got me thinking about video games influence on me. There are so many to chose from, but for inspiring the spirit of adventure nothing beats the Legend of Zelda. The First game in the series I played was A Link to the Past. My love of exploration probably started here. Exploring every nook and cranny of the world looking for new NPC's, artifacts, and power ups. If I had to pick a single moment with the most artist merit from the game it would this:


The mysterious ambiance of the Lost Woods, the clearing where the Master Sword rests, the mist clearing when you pull the sword and the heroic overworld theme playing afterwards. Just chef's kiss. :love:

NES video games introduced me to rpgs.

I posted Ghosts & Goblins both because of the game and because of the arcade cabinet artwork. When I was very young, my dad owned a small arcade. Something about the artwork on the machine spoke to me.

Golden Axe was also a big influence on me. Lizardfolk are a big part of my fantasy vision because of Golden Axe.
 

Mad_Jack

Hero
Although I'd learned to play D&D long before I read the book series, Louis Royo's cover art for the first book in the Hawk & Fisher series got me into Royo's art, which very much matched my visions of D&D at the time, nevermind the fact that it was on the cover of what was essentially a D&D buddy-cop novel by one of my favorite authors... :)


1400024477.0.x.jpg
 




Smackpixi

Adventurer
View attachment 259868

Mercer Mayer's Professor Wormbog in Search for the Zipperump-a-Zoo.

This was a particular favorite book of mine as a young child.

Monsters. Lots of really visually cool monsters. Adventuring investigations with surprises and twists.

It laid a foundation.

I came here to post the same thing. It was my favorite book as a child…maybe second favorite to Richard Scarry’s Cars And Trucks And Things That Go…but I loved it. Here’s the bestiary.
395534A3-F0B7-4915-826B-6E870E7DFA35.jpeg
 

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