So what ever happened to the Far Realm?

Hey all,
I'm a bit new here, but I was wondering, what went wrong with the Far Realm?
It's been around since 2nd edition and all the monsters are amazingly complicated, but it kind of dropped off the map after 4th Edition did everything they could to make every aberration be a pawn of the Far Realm. so how did a dimension where even the gods were afraid to look become something DMs and Players strive to avoid?
 

Salthorae

Imperial Mountain Dew Taster
so how did a dimension where even the gods were afraid to look become something DMs and Players strive to avoid?
Maybe it was a plot of the Far Realm entities all along?

I mean, there is a lot in 5e that hasn't been touched on yet. Far Realms is just one of them.

Though Mind Flayers seem to be a big component of the upcoming BG3 game, so... maybe this is something that will be changing soon'ish?
 

Fanaelialae

Adventurer
I don't think it's anything that anyone's striving to avoid. I think it's just that 5e hasn't delved much into the planes thus far, and the Far Realm is probably down the list. I'm AFB, but I think it at least gets a mention somewhere in the PHB or maybe DMG.
 

aco175

Adventurer
I would like to see more on the shadow plane and some of the others before getting to this one. Looks like the Avernus book starts with those planes where most players will explore first.

I would speculate that other planes get something if this book sells well and/or if they can tie it to other worlds like Greyhawk.
 

LuisCarlos17f

Adventurer
Don't worry. The far realm and its creatures are too good to be forgotten, and many DM love to use it to give a Lovecratian touch to their games and stories. It is simplemenly not yet, we are working with other things.
 
I’m hoping to see the plane of vacuum and ash become more fully developed first.
I'd love to see a book that covers all of the planes and introduces a few creatures from each. Vacuum and Ash are new to me, though. What books are they from?

I would speculate that other planes get something if this book sells well and/or if they can tie it to other worlds like Greyhawk.
Here's hoping. If Eberron goes well we might get some more of the major world settings like Greyhawk.
 
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Nebulous

Adventurer
Don't worry. The far realm and its creatures are too good to be forgotten, and many DM love to use it to give a Lovecratian touch to their games and stories. It is simplemenly not yet, we are working with other things.
Anybody craving some Lovecraftian 5e stuff should pick up Cthulhu Mythos by Sandy Peterson, it's got you covered from races, classes, tomes, spells, gods and monsters.
 

LuisCarlos17f

Adventurer
But D&D has algo homegrown good ideas, for example the kaorti, the Neh-Thalggu or brain collectors, the cranial escynter or the ethergaunts from Fiend Folio 3rd Ed.

And now Lovecraft's work is public domain now, more 75 years after his death. It can used by 3rd party publishers. Pathfinder monster compendium and Starfinder alien archives have got some creatures from Lovecraf's mythos.

And most of D&d players want to kick-ass monsters, not tragic stories about helplessness against unknown primal forces from the void of the universe. D&D stories styles is more "if you use a Deathstar then I will Luke Skywalker with a X-Wing". Players want to defeat their own fears and to learn to have the right balance between self-criticism and faith in oneself. Even Ravenloft or Dark Sun, the darkest lines of D&D worlds have enough space for noble heroism and hope in a better future.

* If WotC publishes a new edition d20 Modern you can bet they will want its own spiritual successor or the Call of Cthulhu, something like the setting "Dark*Matter"
 

Bohandas

Explorer
I'd love to see a book that covers all of the planes and introduces a few creatures from each. Vacuum and Ash are new to me, though. What books are they from?
They're from the Planescape setting, where there were eight "quasielemental" planes between the elemental planes and the energy planes. Vacuum was between air and negative evergy and ash, IIRC, was between fire and negative energy
 

Teemu

Explorer
The mindflayers were explicitly from the material plane (albeit the distant future of the material plane) in Lords of Madness

It was the Eberron setting that made all aberrations far-realm affiliated
Yes, and Eberron was also the first D&D setting to incorporate the Faerie plane into the core cosmology. Both the Far Realm and the Feywild then became part of the core planar structure in subsequent editions.
 

Bohandas

Explorer
Yes, and Eberron was also the first D&D setting to incorporate the Faerie plane into the core cosmology. Both the Far Realm and the Feywild then became part of the core planar structure in subsequent editions.
It incorporated it and screwed it up. The multiverse is supposed to be a subset of the Far Realm, not the other way around. To give a mathematical analogy, if the material plane was the real number line, the multiverse would be the complex plane (or possibly the quaternions) and the Far Realm would be the sedenions
 

Scrivener of Doom

Adventurer
The mindflayers were explicitly from the material plane (albeit the distant future of the material plane) in Lords of Madness

It was the Eberron setting that made all aberrations far-realm affiliated
Lords of Madness specifically states that the progenitors of the illithids are of unknown origin - there's enough implied to go with a Far Realm origin.

I agree that you made a good point about the role of Eberron in making all aberrations into creatures of the Far Realm: Lords of Madness makes reference to this in its introduction.
 

Arnwolf666

Adventurer
I never really understood the concept of the far realm. I just used them as another name for CN Limbo. And I liked that name better.
 

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