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Star Trek Picard extended Comic-Con trailer

MarkB

Adventurer

Oh wow. This looks so much bigger, more far-reaching than I had expected from the first teaser trailer.

EDIT: Updated to working link.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Morrus

Administrator
Staff member
Patrick Stewart sounds older than he does currently in real life, and Spiner has been de-aged. Interesting!

Reports also say Riker is in it. I knew he directed some of it, but apparently he’s actually in it.

I hope there isn’t too much focus on the Romulan stuff. With Nemesis, and the Abrahms Trek reboot, I’m kinda bored of what wasn’t a very interesting plot thread in the first place. I’m not sure I care about this failed Romulus rescue.
 
This looks so good; I agree, more expansive and interesting than I originally imagined.

Who do people think the young woman is? Obviously she's tied to the Borg somehow...maybe the first "Borg child" somehow?
 

Mustrum_Ridcully

Adventurer
This looks so good; I agree, more expansive and interesting than I originally imagined.

Who do people think the young woman is? Obviously she's tied to the Borg somehow...maybe the first "Borg child" somehow?
We actually see Borg children in the first episode we encounter the Borg. They were in some kind of maturation chamber, IIRC, and already had implants.

A theory I've seen about her is that she's actually Lal, though I don't know why or how people get that idea.
Maybe she's actually a young Borg Queen? Maybe she is the Borg Queen, and it's time travel with predestination paradox and all. (I hope not.)

I figure the facility with all the prisoners contains liberated Borg, e.g. people like Hugh that were disconnected from the Collective. The note of "x work days since the last assimilation" might imply that they are contained and isolated to avoid that they form a new collective or reconnect to the regular Borg. The background novel/comics to the first Kelvin Timeline Movie (aka JJ.Trek) suggests that Nero's ship, the Narada, has been modified by Borg technology (not even Romulans build their mining vessels like warships). Star Trek Online uses the idea and suggests the Romulans had a Sphere in the facility that also altered the Narada. Whatever the specifics, that might lead to a lot of imprisoned Borg Drones that might have been disconnected from the Hive. Maybe on the one hand, Picard wants to get these people out of prison. And on the other hand, they represent a threat of, well, the Borg returning in some way, which is why they get imprisoned in the first place. Maybe the Federation or Starfleet is even complicit here, because they have the same worry.
 

doctorbadwolf

Explorer
I love the Romulans and the aftermath of their world dying is explored very interestingly in STO, so I’m looking forward to that.
 

Derren

Villager
This looks so good; I agree, more expansive and interesting than I originally imagined.

Who do people think the young woman is? Obviously she's tied to the Borg somehow...maybe the first "Borg child" somehow?
I guess she is a engineered borg queen who would be able to control other drones.
 

CapnZapp

Adventurer
I think the worst decision was to add individuality to the Borg.

It's done over and over again (in film and literature). First add an implacable (and therefore interesting) threat. Then give it a central processor, or in this case a Queen, and you instantly know the snake now has a head you can cut off.

The interesting foe instantly becomes normal, mundane, defeatable through regular means...

I loved the Borg as presented up until 1996; pre First Contact. Using the captains of your enemy as ultimately disposable commanders is genius.

Growing a head that allows your enemies to kill all of you with a single stroke, OTOH, is hackneyed lazy tired writing.
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
It's done over and over again (in film and literature). First add an implacable (and therefore interesting) threat. Then give it a central processor, or in this case a Queen, and you instantly know the snake now has a head you can cut off.
Truly implacable threats aren't interesting. If they are truly implacable, they kill your protagonists and win and the story ends

An antagonist isn't interesting if you cannot understand it. A human must be able to grasp the antagonist's motivations and plans, or the antagonist is a force of nature - and the antagonist in a natural disaster film isn't the interesting part. Once you can understand an antagonist, they are humanized, and thus have flaws, and can be beaten.
 

Raunalyn

Explorer
I think the worst decision was to add individuality to the Borg.

It's done over and over again (in film and literature). First add an implacable (and therefore interesting) threat. Then give it a central processor, or in this case a Queen, and you instantly know the snake now has a head you can cut off.

The interesting foe instantly becomes normal, mundane, defeatable through regular means...

I loved the Borg as presented up until 1996; pre First Contact. Using the captains of your enemy as ultimately disposable commanders is genius.

Growing a head that allows your enemies to kill all of you with a single stroke, OTOH, is hackneyed lazy tired writing.
I 100% agree with this. The pre First Contact Borg were terrifying; cold, calculating, and utterly fearless, almost like an unstoppable virus that swept everything up before them. Adding individuality to them made them mundane; it was a cheesy way to make them defeatable.
 

Raunalyn

Explorer
Truly implacable threats aren't interesting. If they are truly implacable, they kill your protagonists and win and the story ends

An antagonist isn't interesting if you cannot understand it. A human must be able to grasp the antagonist's motivations and plans, or the antagonist is a force of nature - and the antagonist in a natural disaster film isn't the interesting part. Once you can understand an antagonist, they are humanized, and thus have flaws, and can be beaten.
I agree somewhat. However, it is the journey and growing to overcome that implacable threat that makes an interesting story, too.
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
I agree somewhat. However, it is the journey and growing to overcome that implacable threat that makes an interesting story, too.
There is a huge difference between, "the implacable threat itself is interesting" and "the implacable threat makes for an interesting story and action by the protagonists".
 

CapnZapp

Adventurer
Truly implacable threats aren't interesting. If they are truly implacable, they kill your protagonists and win and the story ends

An antagonist isn't interesting if you cannot understand it. A human must be able to grasp the antagonist's motivations and plans, or the antagonist is a force of nature - and the antagonist in a natural disaster film isn't the interesting part. Once you can understand an antagonist, they are humanized, and thus have flaws, and can be beaten.
Umm... okay? So the argument "I want my foes completely implacable" has been struck down - great for you!

In the meanwhile, what are your opinions on what I am actually saying? :) (Do you like the way the Borg got a Queen, or not?)

Cheers, Z
 

CapnZapp

Adventurer
There is a huge difference between, "the implacable threat itself is interesting" and "the implacable threat makes for an interesting story and action by the protagonists".
And there's a huge difference between that and what I actually wanted to hear your opinions on, which is "giving swarm enemies a talking head is lame and trite" :)
 

MarkB

Adventurer
I agree about the Borg - they lost a lot of their menace with the introduction of the Borg Queen. As a threat which the protagonists had to learn to understand and find ways to effectively oppose they were interesting. Spontaneously becoming more ordinary felt cheap, and a waste of a good antagonist.
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
Umm... okay? So the argument "I want my foes completely implacable" has been struck down - great for you!

In the meanwhile, what are your opinions on what I am actually saying? :) (Do you like the way the Borg got a Queen, or not?)
Well, you say more than one thing - if you want more focus in your answers, keep your presentation more focused :)

I think giving the Borg a face was inevitable. If you don't give them a face, they are, as I already noted, a force of nature. Characters don't interact *personally* with nature. So, dramatically speaking, the force of nature only allows you to play with the interactions you already have. It doesn't create new interactions. So, it is cool a couple of times, but eventually gets repetitive. It is only in relating with other sentient beings that we potentially have an antagonist with staying power.

They held this off as long as they could - exploring the "person" of the Borg through Hugh and 7 of 9. But eventually those become so human as to no longer really be Borg proxies. Eventually, to keep them narratively dynamic, the Borg needed to be personified. Thus, the Queen.

Was this the best personification of the Borg we could imagine? Maybe, maybe not. But something of this ilk was necessary, from a storytelling perspective.
 

Legatus_Legionis

< BLAH HA Ha ha >
Picard's first lines sounded like how he spoke in "The Nightmare before Christmas", IMO.

Now, after seeing this full trailer, I am more interested in this than before. The first teaser/trailer told me blah, this one's tells me it might be good.
 

trancejeremy

Villager
While part of me thinks this is pretty neat, at the same time, I really wish there was a Star Trek that was more like Star Trek of the past...going into space and exploring new worlds.

I play Star Trek Online and basically it's one war after another. Seems like Star Trek has done that on screen since DS9. I mean, war was always part of Star Trek, what with the Klingons and Romulans. But it was more a backdrop, not the focus.
 

Imaculata

Explorer
I've got to admit, seeing the Borg again made me groan a little. Why is that the first thing they go back to?
 

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