Star Wars: Andor

Zaukrie

New Publisher
I know I've already posted this in the thread, but, wow, great tv. Seriously love this show now that we aren't getting flashbacks.....so good.
 

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Reminded me more of things like "Buck Rogers" and "Genesis 2."


EDIT Anyone recognize the name of the lead character from another, later Roddenberry spawned project?
Hercules in Space! Also known as Andromeda. Arguably, until Sorbo took full control, it had a pretty neat story and setting, but when he drove away key writers it became less interesting... Never watched the final season, I think.
 

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
Hercules in Space! Also known as Andromeda. Arguably, until Sorbo took full control, it had a pretty neat story and setting, but when he drove away key writers it became less interesting... Never watched the final season, I think.

There were a few promising, but ultimately terribly unsatisfying, "UHF" scifi shows in the 90s.

The two that spring to mind are always Earth:Final Conflict and Andromeda.

Both shows had really good first seasons (especially for the time), and then completely cratered after that.

You point out what happened with Andromeda (Sorbo seizing more control and marginalizing the writers and actors that made the show ... you know ... good). An even greater tragedy, in my opinion, was E:FC. It was also based on a Rodenberry idea.

The first season was genuinely good and intriguing for its time ... not great, but solid and had a few episodes that showed you the potential. And then ... there was an issue with the main actor (Kevin Kilner) and they went in a terrible and stupid direction. It went from a good and intriguing show to one of the worst things on television.
 

Ryujin

Legend
Hercules in Space! Also known as Andromeda. Arguably, until Sorbo took full control, it had a pretty neat story and setting, but when he drove away key writers it became less interesting... Never watched the final season, I think.

Having seen both I'm pretty sure that the original idea for "Andromeda" was first shown in "Genesis II." Both are Roddenberry-based projects. Both involve a man who has been effectively frozen in time until long past when his world has ended. Both involve bad guys who are arguably superior to regular humans. I would say that of the two, "Genesis II" was the better property. Not only was Lyra-a (Mariette Hartley)
hot and had two navels, but the movie also had Lurch the Butler (Ted Cassidy) in a starring role.

There were a few promising, but ultimately terribly unsatisfying, "UHF" scifi shows in the 90s.

The two that spring to mind are always Earth:Final Conflict and Andromeda.

Both shows had really good first seasons (especially for the time), and then completely cratered after that.

You point out what happened with Andromeda (Sorbo seizing more control and marginalizing the writers and actors that made the show ... you know ... good). An even greater tragedy, in my opinion, was E:FC. It was also based on a Rodenberry idea.

The first season was genuinely good and intriguing for its time ... not great, but solid and had a few episodes that showed you the potential. And then ... there was an issue with the main actor (Kevin Kilner) and they went in a terrible and stupid direction. It went from a good and intriguing show to one of the worst things on television.
Don't forget about "TekWar." Created by Captain Kirk. Starring BJ, but no Bear, and also featuring a rather young Andromeda.
 

Apart from the last couple of action shots, that fan intro does an excellent job of making it look like a show with a 1970s BBC budget: all story and acting, no sets or effects (or at least nothing that couldn't be filmed in an old quarry or using a polystyrene model).
If they got anything wrong, it's the choice of font for the credits. Too modern.

Still slow, compared to Space 1999...

The font is similar, but not quite right...
 
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Some people here and elsewhere wonder if Luthien might be a former Jedi (or even Sith). It's possible, but here is my reasoning why within Andor's more "grounded" feeling it would be wrong:
The time for Jedi to save the day comes later, after the ordinary people have done the basics. The Rebellion's foundation and growth must be based on the expressed will of the oppressed, the victims of the Empire starting to resist, not the whims of a superpowered individual. Only then does the legitimacy exist for what is basically a superhero to help them accomplish their goal. It's already the will of the people for the Empire to end, they just can't do it alone because the Empire is lead by a supervillain, too.

If the Jedi basically manipulate the Rebellion into existence, it loses legitimacy. Of course, some would point out that it's a symmetry, a Sith manipulated the Empire into existence, a Jedi manipulates the Rebellion to defeat it. But I think it violates the spirit of the Jedi being the good guys. The Sith do things because they want to serve their own interests, the Jedi do things to serve the interests of the people. For a correct symmetry, the Rebellion has to be started and organized by "ordinary" folk.

I could be wrong, of course, then you can all laugh and point.
 


Ryujin

Legend
Some people here and elsewhere wonder if Luthien might be a former Jedi (or even Sith). It's possible, but here is my reasoning why within Andor's more "grounded" feeling it would be wrong:
The time for Jedi to save the day comes later, after the ordinary people have done the basics. The Rebellion's foundation and growth must be based on the expressed will of the oppressed, the victims of the Empire starting to resist, not the whims of a superpowered individual. Only then does the legitimacy exist for what is basically a superhero to help them accomplish their goal. It's already the will of the people for the Empire to end, they just can't do it alone because the Empire is lead by a supervillain, too.

If the Jedi basically manipulate the Rebellion into existence, it loses legitimacy. Of course, some would point out that it's a symmetry, a Sith manipulated the Empire into existence, a Jedi manipulates the Rebellion to defeat it. But I think it violates the spirit of the Jedi being the good guys. The Sith do things because they want to serve their own interests, the Jedi do things to serve the interests of the people. For a correct symmetry, the Rebellion has to be started and organized by "ordinary" folk.

I could be wrong, of course, then you can all laugh and point.
I absolutely agree with this. The Jedi are supposed to serve, not lead. And it makes sense that a dealer in antiquities not only knows about Lightsabres, but has an understanding of how Kyber Crystal tech works (talking about his ship-borne "lightsabres" here).
 

Rabulias

the Incomparably Shrewd and Clever
Luthen's past, Jedi or not, is something I hope they can touch on more in season 2. @Celebrim and @Mustrum_Ridcully both make great cases on the both sides of the Luthen Jedi question. I don't know if it is intentional, but I love that the show has hints to support both arguments.
 
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pukunui

Legend
The sh
Luthen's past, Jedi or not, or something I hope they can touch on more in season 2. @Celebrim and @Mustrum_Ridcully both make great cases on the both sides of the Luthen Jedi question. I don't know if it is intentional, but I love that the show has hints to support both arguments.
As I mentioned somewhere upthread, Tony Gilroy (Andor's showrunner) has stated that Luthen's backstory will be revealed on the show.
 
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Some people here and elsewhere wonder if Luthien might be a former Jedi (or even Sith). It's possible, but here is my reasoning why within Andor's more "grounded" feeling it would be wrong:
The time for Jedi to save the day comes later, after the ordinary people have done the basics. The Rebellion's foundation and growth must be based on the expressed will of the oppressed, the victims of the Empire starting to resist, not the whims of a superpowered individual. Only then does the legitimacy exist for what is basically a superhero to help them accomplish their goal. It's already the will of the people for the Empire to end, they just can't do it alone because the Empire is lead by a supervillain, too.

If the Jedi basically manipulate the Rebellion into existence, it loses legitimacy. Of course, some would point out that it's a symmetry, a Sith manipulated the Empire into existence, a Jedi manipulates the Rebellion to defeat it. But I think it violates the spirit of the Jedi being the good guys. The Sith do things because they want to serve their own interests, the Jedi do things to serve the interests of the people. For a correct symmetry, the Rebellion has to be started and organized by "ordinary" folk.

I could be wrong, of course, then you can all laugh and point.
I agree. It has also been mentioned that a Luthien toy
the assumed-to be a lightsabre he carries actually contains a regular concealed blade.

My feeling is Luthien-jedi is a deliberate fake-out.
 


MarkB

Legend
One way Luthien might have Kyber weapons on his ship is if he has a history with Galen Erso. It's already confirmed that Saw Gerrera is a mutual acquaintance.
Or they might not be lightsaber tech at all. The LAAT gunships in the clone wars had composite-beam lasers that were functionally similar to those on Luthen's ship, and they were mass-produced.
 

Ryujin

Legend
Or they might not be lightsaber tech at all. The LAAT gunships in the clone wars had composite-beam lasers that were functionally similar to those on Luthen's ship, and they were mass-produced.
But Luthen has already been shown to have access to at least one Kyber Crystal, which is what makes me think that might be the tech involved.
 


Celebrim

Legend
I think we have seen in the show that it is a collapsible walking stick. It may also serve as weapon but we have not seen it used as such so far.

I believe the blade was shown in episode 2 or 3.

It's important to consider that the toy maker is making the two based off what was revealed to them in footage given to them for the first episode. The fact that Luthen's collapsible walking stick also has a concealed blade in the hilt does not explain Luthen's behavior or the writer's continually reminding us of the existence of his accessory.

Luthen's stick at the least is his "James Bond" toy. He values it as something more than a walking stick with a concealed vibro-knife in the hilt. It's part of his signature and his persona, and the writers really don't want the audience to forget it.

So they have a plan for it of some such, and it's not just for hiking.
 
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MarkB

Legend
I believe the blade was shown in episode 2 or 3.

It's important to consider that the two maker is making the two based off what was revealed to them in footage given to them for the first episode. The fact that Luthen's collapsible walking stick also has a concealed blade in the hilt does not explain Luthen's behavior or the writer's continually reminding us of the existence of his accessory.

Luthen's stick at the least is his "James Bond" toy. He values it as something more than a walking stick with a concealed vibro-knife in the hilt. It's part of his signature and his persona, and the writers really don't want the audience to forget it.

So they have a plan for it of some such, and it's not just for hiking.
Is it really that prominent? I saw it when it was highlighted in the frisking scene when he visited Saw, but I have no conscious memory of having seen it in any other scene. Certainly I wouldn't consider it as having been continually brought to light.
 

Ryujin

Legend
I believe the blade was shown in episode 2 or 3.

It's important to consider that the two maker is making the two based off what was revealed to them in footage given to them for the first episode. The fact that Luthen's collapsible walking stick also has a concealed blade in the hilt does not explain Luthen's behavior or the writer's continually reminding us of the existence of his accessory.

Luthen's stick at the least is his "James Bond" toy. He values it as something more than a walking stick with a concealed vibro-knife in the hilt. It's part of his signature and his persona, and the writers really don't want the audience to forget it.

So they have a plan for it of some such, and it's not just for hiking.
It has a certain "Chekov's Gun" feel to it.
 

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