D&D General What alignment is candy corn?

What alignment is candy corn?

  • Lawful Good

    Votes: 3 3.9%
  • Neutral Good

    Votes: 4 5.3%
  • Chaotic Good

    Votes: 9 11.8%
  • Lawful Neutral

    Votes: 6 7.9%
  • Chaotic Neutral

    Votes: 11 14.5%
  • Lawful Evil

    Votes: 5 6.6%
  • Neutral Evil

    Votes: 6 7.9%
  • Chaotic Evil

    Votes: 23 30.3%
  • Pineapple

    Votes: 7 9.2%
  • Whiskey

    Votes: 6 7.9%
  • Peeps

    Votes: 13 17.1%
  • Han Solo Neutral

    Votes: 5 6.6%
  • Druid/Daoist Neutra

    Votes: 5 6.6%


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niklinna

učim hrvatski
Yeah, all well-made candy corn is. Butter, honey, marshmallow, and vanilla are the flavor ingredients.
That's the problem with so many things; people's principal experience is of a crap version of something that they might otherwise like, if it were made with good things. Of course candy corn is awful when it's made from low-grade corn syrup and wax!
 

Vaalingrade

Legend
I... didn't say the kind I'm used to was awful.

I like them about the same. The honey one is just different from the corn candy I remember. More like the candy pumpkins of yesteryear.
 

niklinna

učim hrvatski
I... didn't say the kind I'm used to was awful.
Oh I was making a general statement, nothing about you personally or the specific candy corn you're used to!

I like them about the same. The honey one is just different from the corn candy I remember. More like the candy pumpkins of yesteryear.
That would be interesting. In searching for candy corn without gelatin (which I did find), I also found a lot of home recipes that sound quite interesting. I doubt I'm industrious enough to make a batch for myself though!
 



*I am given to understand this is because artificial grape flavor--methyl anthranilate--only makes grape candy taste like Concord grapes specifically. Since no one eats them as table grapes, "grape" flavor tastes like grapes no one eats (except as awful, awful jam/jelly)!
I've heard the same thing levelled at artificial banana flavor (that it doesn't taste right because it is made to resemble Gros Michel strains of banana, which was decimated by fungus in the 1950s and we now mostly consume Cavendish bananas). I'm not sure I buy that one 100% -- sure isoamyl acetate exists at higher concentration in Gros Michel bananas, but a side issue is that some of the flavor profile of bananas comes from molecules with aldol-reaction formed bonds, which can be finicky under different pHs and may not be reasonable to include in some candy-making processes. Same may be true for artificial grape and it not tasting like table or wine grapes.
 

EzekielRaiden

Follower of the Way
I've heard the same thing levelled at artificial banana flavor (that it doesn't taste right because it is made to resemble Gros Michel strains of banana, which was decimated by fungus in the 1950s and we now mostly consume Cavendish bananas). I'm not sure I buy that one 100% -- sure isoamyl acetate exists at higher concentration in Gros Michel bananas, but a side issue is that some of the flavor profile of bananas comes from molecules with aldol-reaction formed bonds, which can be finicky under different pHs and may not be reasonable to include in some candy-making processes. Same may be true for artificial grape and it not tasting like table or wine grapes.
With the grapes it actually is a legit thing though. Concord grapes are a hybrid with a different species (vitis labrusca, the "fox grape," provides about 2/3 of its genes, with the remaining 1/3 mostly coming from the more typical species, vitis vinifera, the species usually used for table grapes and winemaking.) Methyl anthranilate is found in far higher concentrations in labrusca grapes.

Being perfectly honest, I had previously thought that Concord grape jelly was laced with artificial sources of methyl anthranilate in order to make it taste more like grape candy (in one of those "reality is unrealistic" kinds of ways.) So at least anecdotally, yes, there is a very distinctive difference between Concord grape flavor and "regular" grape flavors. (I personally prefer green or white grapes myself.) Coupled with the general social apprehension that "grape flavor doesn't taste like grapes, it just tastes 'purple',” I think we can reasonably conclude that there is a perceptual difference between the two and artificial flavoring sharpens that difference a lot.
 



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