What Licensed RPG Do You Wish Used A Different System?

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aramis erak

Legend
I think people make too much of 2d20s metacurrency pools. It isn't really a narrative system, unless you say any game with "hero points" is a narrative system.
It does, however, require the GM to spend metacurrency to add various things in mid scene.
And allows adding NPCs and traps with very limited need to back explain it; it just happens to be there once the GM spends the points.
And conversely, the players can buy equipment in the scene for similar costs.

That puts it well outside Trad.
 

Reynard

Legend
It does, however, require the GM to spend metacurrency to add various things in mid scene.
And allows adding NPCs and traps with very limited need to back explain it; it just happens to be there once the GM spends the points.
And conversely, the players can buy equipment in the scene for similar costs.

That puts it well outside Trad.
That requirement is because there is a metacurrency flow built into the system, not because it is "narrative." If the GM spends everything on combat only, the game is unbalanced. And many, many trad games allow players to spend "hero points" to have an item they need or a convenient environment element or an unusual or circumstantial use of an ability.
 

aramis erak

Legend
That requirement is because there is a metacurrency flow built into the system, not because it is "narrative." If the GM spends everything on combat only, the game is unbalanced. And many, many trad games allow players to spend "hero points" to have an item they need or a convenient environment element or an unusual or circumstantial use of an ability.
From where I sit, if the fate point do more than keep your character breathing, they've taken the game well outside the Trad space. Most of my older players (born before 1990) consider WFRP 1 to have left because it has fate points that save your character's butt from a lethal situation.

And 2d20, with it's traits being +1, -1, can do, or cannot do, and sometimes being used for multiple things... well, that's every bit as narrativist as Cortex Plus/Prime or FATE. (None of which would I put firmly into the narrativist space, either ... Blood & Honor, well... THAT's as narrativist as AW or other PBTA/AWE games. )
 

Reynard

Legend
From where I sit, if the fate point do more than keep your character breathing, they've taken the game well outside the Trad space.
That is a peculiar definition of "trad" and "narrativist."
Most of my older players (born before 1990) consider WFRP 1 to have left because it has fate points that save your character's butt from a lethal situation.
Gognards gonna grognard, I guess (Note, I was born well before 1990).
And 2d20, with it's traits being +1, -1, can do, or cannot do, and sometimes being used for multiple things... well, that's every bit as narrativist as Cortex Plus/Prime or FATE. (None of which would I put firmly into the narrativist space, either ... Blood & Honor, well... THAT's as narrativist as AW or other PBTA/AWE games. )
I don't know Cortex, but Fate is not wholly a narrative game. it layers its narrative elements on top of a pretty traditional core mechanic. Again, metacurrency in and of itself isn't "narrativist" but YMMV.
 

aramis erak

Legend
don't know Cortex, but Fate is not wholly a narrative game. it layers its narrative elements on top of a pretty traditional core mechanic. Again, metacurrency in and of itself isn't "narrativist" but YMMV.
When it buys things to be added into the narrative state, it certainly the hell is! and that's a strong part of the use in both Cortex Plus/Prime and in Fate. If you are not using PP/FP to add things in, you're not playing the game as designed. They both can, every bit as much as Destiny spends in FFG SW or Genesys, or 2d20 Momentum, simply pop things into existence that are then presumed to have been there all along.

"I need a thermal detonator..." plot point, crosses off the relevant stashed one at the base, "I stopped by the armory on the way out and grabbed one." - that's a perfectly valid mechanical action which has "story revision wave" written all over it.

In Dune - player spent momentum to have grabbed his father's shield belt... 3 scenes after daddy died.

In 2d20 trek... "I just happen to have been studying up on Bortalian Biology, which is similar to the local" (Temporary trait. Provides a +1 to analyze it, and probably enables getting to make more sweeping assertions.

In all three, the mechanics are directly impacting the narrative by adding things that simply weren't in the story to that point.
 

Reynard

Legend
When it buys things to be added into the narrative state, it certainly the hell is! and that's a strong part of the use in both Cortex Plus/Prime and in Fate. If you are not using PP/FP to add things in, you're not playing the game as designed. They both can, every bit as much as Destiny spends in FFG SW or Genesys, or 2d20 Momentum, simply pop things into existence that are then presumed to have been there all along.

"I need a thermal detonator..." plot point, crosses off the relevant stashed one at the base, "I stopped by the armory on the way out and grabbed one." - that's a perfectly valid mechanical action which has "story revision wave" written all over it.

In Dune - player spent momentum to have grabbed his father's shield belt... 3 scenes after daddy died.

In 2d20 trek... "I just happen to have been studying up on Bortalian Biology, which is similar to the local" (Temporary trait. Provides a +1 to analyze it, and probably enables getting to make more sweeping assertions.

In all three, the mechanics are directly impacting the narrative by adding things that simply weren't in the story to that point.
So a variable power pool in Hero is a narrative mechanic? Who knew.
 


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