D&D (2024) What Should D&D 2024 Have Been +

ECMO3

Hero
Meaningful choices aren't simple. Simple good.

Therefore we should have just one class...

The Wizard. Because it's the only class that's apparently untouchable.

I guess I would be ok with a game that was only Wizards and I can't imagine any other class that could make this lift. We would need subclasses that probe the other thematic elements of the other classes.

I think this would clearly redefine the game and the role of PCs in it.

Right now there is a lot of friction caused on message boards by the fact that supernatural, magical PCs can break the laws of Physics and are at certain levels more powerful than PCs who can't bend or outright break science. This could potentially alleviate that friction.

While this would better achieve balance it also would reduce choice and that is not something I favor. Players should be presented with choices. It should be made explicitly clear that all choices are not equal in terms of power and then players should choose the PC they want to play.
 

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Vaalingrade

Legend
While this would better achieve balance it also would reduce choice and that is not something I favor. Players should be presented with choices. It should be made explicitly clear that all choices are not equal in terms of power and then players should choose the PC they want to play.
Or.

Ooooor.

All the choices can be made equal in terms of power because there's no good justification not to and president that is can be done.
 

This is a nice thread. Maybe a bit early to moan over some things. I think it will be interesting to compare wishes here with the final PHB and DMG and see which wishes are actually in the new books, even if they are just optional.
 
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Micah Sweet

Level Up & OSR Enthusiast
4e definitely had various growth options throughout an adventurer’s career (or at least at regular intervals).

3e had prestige classes, but my experience with those was that most prestige classes were not so much “choices at higher levels” but rather “something to plan from level 1” in order to meet the prerequisites in reasonable time.

Anything else you were referring to?
Level Up has a wide variety of features to choose from for all classes ar most levels, combat and otherwise.
 

Laurefindel

Legend
Level Up has a wide variety of features to choose from for all classes ar most levels, combat and otherwise.
Indeed. Level-up has a lot to offer, but the post I was replying to was referring to older iterations of the game.

[edit] My bad, “other versions of the game” were the exact terms used, which I guess can include Level-Up
 


Quickleaf

Legend
It's hard to say, right, cause 2024 D&D isn't out yet and apart from player-facing rules like classes, races, bastions, weapons, spells – we really know very little about what will be updated/changed.

I do feel the trend for 2024 D&D is too microscopic (i.e. zooming in on specific aspects of combat-focused stuff) for my tastes, and is missing bigger picture stuff (for simplicity sake, you can assume I mean exploration & roleplaying). I can see the trend with modern D&D is that ship has sailed and it's probably not steering back that direction anytime soon.

Stuff like reworking what's a class, what's a subclass, debate over which subclasses to include – my personal opinion is that's basically engaging in the microscopic mindset of WotC and is missing the boat of some underlying issues that haven't been addressed/recognized. Nothing wrong with going microscopic, but to me it's sort of like debating the cut of rafter tails when there are water infiltration issues in the foundation.

Sorry for the strangely nautical metaphors.
 

3e had prestige classes, but my experience with those was that most prestige classes were not so much “choices at higher levels” but rather “something to plan from level 1” in order to meet the prerequisites in reasonable time.
I think 3E's prestige class was a good idea that went wrong. In the original core, it was more presented as a world building tool for DMs. Create a prestige class to represent something special in your world, and then present it to the players at some point in the campaign as an optional path they can multiclass into. In that capacity, it was a good evolution of D&D design, IMO. Unfortunately (or fortunately for the CharOp advocates, I suppose), it didn't take long for future books to turn it into a purely player facing building block, and a source of significant power creep in the edition. And of course, as you pointed out, it also went from being an option to the option that directed players' other character building choices.

I think if I was to redesign the concept, it would be closer to 2E's kits, but more consistently designed, and something a player can take at levels other than level 1. Make it something of a rider the DM can optionally present, and the player can optionally accept. Doesn't take up space in the main progression system like prestige classes did, and doesn't lock you into anything for future progression like subclasses do.

Combine that with my other post, and increase the rate at which feats are gained (in my 10 level setup, I'd go so far as giving one per level), and you'd have a progression system where players constantly have progression choices to make, and the DM has tools to give avenues for the player to do so in a way that fits into their campaign world.
 



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