D&D General When D&D Co-Creator Dave Arneson Asked WotC For A Job!

Back in 1997, after WotC had purchased the failing TSR (and D&D), and just prior to the launch of D&D 3E, Dave Arneson -- who co-created D&D in the 1970s along with Gary Gygax -- wrote to WotC president Peter Adkison asking to be put in charge of TSR.

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Ben Riggs -- author of Slaying the Dragon -- discovered Arneson's letter to Adkison while researching his history of D&D.


The letter was full of typos -- Arneson even got Adkison's name wrong! According to Riggs, Adkison did not reply, and Arneson wrote to him a second time.
 

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R_J_K75

Legend
I assume it would depend on industry and where you are. In my area teaching jobs (the thing I'm generally applying for) almost invariably involve "cover letters" as a required part of the online application and they are always a dumb ordeal.
I'm in Western NY and worked as a Mechanical Designer. All the jobs whether contracts or direct hire all went through headhunters or temp agencies, and these companies would spam all the job boards with the same jobs. More times than not any job I applied for I just sent a resume, but there was no way to follow up, and my application just vanished into the ether. After meeting with After meeting with job placement experts at college and government agencies they told me to pare back my resume, use specific fonts and formatting and never send a cover letter, otherwise my application would never make to the person who needed to see it.
 

darjr

I crit!
I'm in Western NY and worked as a Mechanical Designer. All the jobs whether contracts or direct hire all went through headhunters or temp agencies, and these companies would spam all the job boards with the same jobs. More times than not any job I applied for I just sent a resume, but there was no way to follow up, and my application just vanished into the ether. After meeting with After meeting with job placement experts at college and government agencies they told me to pare back my resume, use specific fonts and formatting and never send a cover letter, otherwise my application would never make to the person who needed to see it.
No cover letter? Why would they not see it?
 

Warpiglet-7

Cry havoc! And let slip the pigs of war!
Yeah, I have a thing for old games. When I first encountered it, I didn't know how to place it (or a lot of the history we have now).

Of course, it all makes more sense now. It's ... well, it's a lot like OD&D, take two. It's Arneson, but filtered through a different co-author. You can squint and see some of what the Blackmoor people said about his home game ... but rationalized to a written system. This time, filtered a little more through Snider's "cleaning up."

Fundamentally, Arneson lacked the capacity to translate his gaming to paper. His skills lay in his improvisation, and he lacked the vocabulary to translate that into a system of rules.
This is exactly why I think Gygax gets the lion’s share of credit in my mind.

Kids have played pretend stories with toys back ages. Codifying rules and having a system with something to it is a step up.

HG Wells and toy soldiers to rpg…

My bias is showing again 🤷‍♂️
 

R_J_K75

Legend
No cover letter? Why would they not see it?
I was told 2 reasons. The first is most employers dont want them and dont read them. You can expect a prospective employer will skim your resume for about 15-30 seconds, let alone read a cover letter. Secondly, most if not all applications are online and go through filter software that either accepts or rejects your resume based on keywords, then a live person might read it. A cover letter just ups the odds that you'll be rejected based on the keywords the software is looking for based on the job description.
 

the Jester

Legend
And I think that there was a higher tolerance for people who ... admired (is that the preferred word) the Axis in WW2 among the wargaming set than there was in the general population.
I think a lot of wargamers admire the Nazi military machine because of how devastating and effective it was, but I don't know how many admire the Axis for more dubious reasons.
 

MGibster

Legend
No, and I wouldn't want to tar people just by association. But at a certain point, you have to think some people back then knew, and just didn't care.

And I think that there was a higher tolerance for people who ... admired (is that the preferred word) the Axis in WW2 among the wargaming set than there was in the general population.
In their defense, there was a prevailing myth regarding the mighty German war machine at the time. Blinded by the myth of German efficacy, many war gamers placed them on a pedestal unaware of the myriad of faults in doctrine and the problems with their equipment. (Yes, the Tiger was a good tank. But it was overcomplicated, prone to breaking down, and spare parts were tough to come by. Oh, and the Germans only produced 1,200 of them to our 40,000 Shermans.)

Like the Confederacy, a lot of war gamers had attributed the German loss primarily to America's industrial base and the Soviet's ability to take casualties like there's no tomorrow. They elevated the wehrmact and ignored the fact that Allied forces, even the Soviets, outfought the germans. This admiration for Germany typically didn't include fascist ideology though. Just a misplaced admiration for the efficacy of their military.
 

Warpiglet-7

Cry havoc! And let slip the pigs of war!
I think a lot of wargamers admire the Nazi military machine because of how devastating and effective it was, but I don't know how many admire the Axis for more dubious reasons.
For sure. We used to also choose axis in games for the challenge—since they were destined to lose after a certain point.
 



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