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D&D 5E Why doesn't D&D have its own Showcase video like MtG does?

Why doesn't D&D have its own Showcase video like MtG does?

I'd been cool to learn what D&D book releases we can expect next year.

Or they could add D&D books to the MtG Showcase, honestly I'm surprised the MtG 2021 Showcase had no mention of Cirriculum of Chaos at all, it's an MtG setting.
 

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Because MTG has way more product releases, a bigger budget (I assume) and a different player base.

Many (most?) mtg players dont care about things like Curriculum of Chaos or the various MTG/D&D cross over settings. I participate in both, but I avoid those settings in D&D, I dont want that cross over at all.

They announced Commander Legends: Battle For Baldur's Gate at Showcase 2021,it's a crossover.
 


I'd been cool to learn what D&D book releases we can expect next year.
Up until 5E as far as I recall TSR & WotC put out a product release schedule well in advance. TSR used to put out yearly catalogs with everything that was being released for the year, pretty sure this stopped about 2001 or so. Like alot of things the internet made it unnecessary. 5E releases are much less per year than some other editions but I agree it would be nice to know whats coming out for the year from the start. I really liked looking through the catalogs & websites and loosely planning my campaigns around things I was going to buy.
 



Up until 5E as far as I recall TSR & WotC put out a product release schedule well in advance. TSR used to put out yearly catalogs with everything that was being released for the year, pretty sure this stopped about 2001 or so. Like alot of things the internet made it unnecessary. 5E releases are much less per year than some other editions but I agree it would be nice to know whats coming out for the year from the start. I really liked looking through the catalogs & websites and loosely planning my campaigns around things I was going to buy.

Exactly, it's nice to be able to plan spending in advance.
 

Scribe

Hero
Exactly, it's nice to be able to plan spending in advance.
Yes for the consumer.

For the company, its better for them to have us not know, so that we do not skip a purchase, for something we would rather have later.

Personally I dont know if that is a concern to them with the limited number of D&D releases, but other companies behave in that manner.
 

Yes for the consumer.

For the company, its better for them to have us not know, so that we do not skip a purchase, for something we would rather have later.

Personally I dont know if that is a concern to them with the limited number of D&D releases, but other companies behave in that manner.

Telling folks we'll in advance has worked out well for WotC in MtG, don't see why D&D would be any different, if anything wallet fatigue would be less of an issue for D&D.
 

Scribe

Hero
Telling folks we'll in advance has worked out well for WotC in MtG, don't see why D&D would be any different, if anything wallet fatigue would be less of an issue for D&D.
MTG folk's, by and large, purchase tons of product. They (MtG) are making gains year over year, and have been for some time.

What I would propose is: It doesnt matter what it is, people are buying Magic cards, every release, and it doesnt matter what it is.

Does that apply to D&D folks? I dont know.
 

MTG folk's, by and large, purchase tons of product. They (MtG) are making gains year over year, and have been for some time.

What I would propose is: It doesnt matter what it is, people are buying Magic cards, every release, and it doesnt matter what it is.

Does that apply to D&D folks? I dont know.

I have yet to hear of a 5e D&D official book with poor sales. Heck even some dmsguild books sell well.

And it does matter what it is, some MtG sets sell better then others and it matter to whom a particular set sells too, AFR was Polarizing, so they shifted FR & other D&D MtG products out of Standard to Supplemental Sets (possibly Secret Lairs too hopefully).
 

Scribe

Hero
And it does matter what it is, some MtG sets sell better then others and it matter to whom a particular set sells too, AFR was Polarizing, so they shifted FR & other D&D MtG products out of Standard to Supplemental Sets (possibly Secret Lairs too hopefully).
Polarizing or not, it sold yes? It doesnt matter what it is. Commander sets sell. Modern sets sell, Standard obviously sells. Secret Lair sells, it all sells, because its big enough, and addicting enough, with enough speculators as well, that it simply is this self perpetuating machine.

What was the last set that Maro flat out said sucked in terms of sales?
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
Why doesn't D&D have its own Showcase video like MtG does?

I'd been cool to learn what D&D book releases we can expect next year.

Or they could add D&D books to the MtG Showcase, honestly I'm surprised the MtG 2021 Showcase had no mention of Cirriculum of Chaos at all, it's an MtG setting.
There is, it's called D&D Live in late Spring/early Summer.

The difference is between the development timescale of Magic and D&D products. The Magic showcase is talking about products that have all been in production for years already at the time of announcement. D&D book products have a 12-13 month cycle from conception to publication, per Ray Winninger. That means they aren't nearly as far along in 2022 products as Magic is.

Totally different turnaround in development. There is 0% chance that anything Magic announced wil lbe cancelled next year (delayed, maybe, if circumstances warrant, but not cancelled). Any D&D book in the same timeframe might still be cancelled or put on the back burner.
 

There is, it's called D&D Live in late Spring/early Summer.

The difference is between the development timescale of Magic and D&D products. The Magic showcase is talking about products that have all been in production for years already at the time of announcement. D&D book products have a 12-13 month cycle from conception to publication, per Ray Winninger. That means they aren't nearly as far along in 2022 products as Magic is.

Totally different turnaround in development. There is 0% chance that anything Magic announced wil lbe cancelled next year (delayed, maybe, if circumstances warrant, but not cancelled). Any D&D book in the same timeframe might still be cancelled or put on the back burner.

Well the 2 Classical settings at least were confirmed to be past the stage were they might be canceled, so those are a lock at least, while the 1 revisit and 2 new settings were going well, but not locked in as it were, at least the last we heard, which was months ago so maybe 1 or 2 of those settings are also out of the danger zone by now.

And we first heard about the 3 Classic settings books they were working on LAST September and only one if them released this year, so at least some books have a longer cycle then 12 to 13 months.

Oh and some MtG products have shorter cycles then others, Standard sets are as you said, but Supplemental sets can go much quicker and the up coming Commander Legends: Battle For Baldur's Gate was given as an example of that in Mark Rosewaters blog.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
Well the 2 Classical settings at least were confirmed to be past the stage were they might be canceled, so those are a lock at least, while the 1 revisit and 2 new settings were going well, but not locked in as it were, at least the last we heard, which was months ago so maybe 1 or 2 of those settings are also out of the danger zone by now.

And we first heard about the 3 Classic settings books they were working on LAST September and only one if them released this year, so at least some books have a longer cycle then 12 to 13 months.

Oh and some MtG products have shorter cycles then others, Standard sets are as you said, but Supplemental sets can go much quicker and the up coming Commander Legends: Battle For Baldur's Gate was given as an example of that in Mark Rosewaters blog.
Still, it's a different product cycle.
 

Polarizing or not, it sold yes? It doesnt matter what it is. Commander sets sell. Modern sets sell, Standard obviously sells. Secret Lair sells, it all sells, because its big enough, and addicting enough, with enough speculators as well, that it simply is this self perpetuating machine.

What was the last set that Maro flat out said sucked in terms of sales?

Kamigawa ironically given its being given a new set next year or Lorwyn/Shadowmoor whose future will likely depend on Kamigawa Neon Dynasty's success or failure. Before that I think Coldsnap did poorly.
 


We first heard about the 3 Classic settings last year at D&D Celebration 2020, by June 14th 2021 Ravenloft was already released and we got the following tweet where we found out the manuscript for 1 of the setting lead by Chris Perkins was complete, while another was ramping up.

3 other settings were in early development, 1 revisit, 2 new settings none from MtG and still in the danger zone, but going well. That suggests A) The first Classic setting is very likely going to be very early 2022 as it's already had 3 months already after finishing the manuscript for art and editing, ect... B) That it's going to take longer then 12 to 13 months of development C) the 3 projects might have had enough time to either fail or get out of the danger zone too, I mean the 2 Classic settings were safe by 8 months, it's only been abit over 3 months for the other 3, but it might be enough perhaps.

WinningerR

"@WinningerR

@Wizards_DnD

Settings Update: As I've mentioned on a couple of occasions, there are two more products that revive "classic" settings in production right now. (1/4)

1:33 PM · Jun 14, 2021·Twitter Web App

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WinningerR

@WinningerR

·

Jun 14

Replying to

@WinningerR

The manuscript for the first, overseen by

@ChrisPerkinsDnD

, is nearly complete. Work on the second, led by

@FWesSchneider

with an assist from

@AriLevitch

, is just ramping up in earnest. Both are targeting 2022 and formats you've never seen before. (2/4)"
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
When in the cycle do you think a D&D book is past the danger zone, 6 months?

I mean by then it's roughly half way done, maybe some if the art has been done, a far amount has been invested in the book.
I mean, hard to say. They felt confident in rolling out their October/November books this year in mid-June, which is less than 6 months. I wonder if they were in a situation where they felt that either Fizban's or Strixhaven might not make it all the way but both turned out well so they adjusted.
 

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