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Willow - Official Teaser Trailer

Aeson

I am the mysterious professor.
This is one of the things that makes it feel so D&D to me. The dialogue sounds like a bunch of players talking in-character, with all the odd mix of modernisms and traditional fantasy-world dialogue that entails.
I agree. They tried too hard with The Rings of Power. I think this makes it easier for a younger audience to get into.

No one has complained that Princess Kit and Prince Evil don't have English accents like everyone else? I find that a little shocking. It's such a minor nit to pick but I thought someone would have been picking at it by now.
 

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Dire Bare

Legend
I agree. They tried too hard with The Rings of Power. I think this makes it easier for a younger audience to get into.

No one has complained that Princess Kit and Prince Evil don't have English accents like everyone else? I find that a little shocking. It's such a minor nit to pick but I thought someone would have been picking at it by now.
And the "English" accents we do get are from all over the UK . . . .

I noticed the inconsistency, but it doesn't bother me. It's light-hearted fantasy fare, and the anachronistic dialogue is part of the charm for me.
 


Ryujin

Legend
I agree. They tried too hard with The Rings of Power. I think this makes it easier for a younger audience to get into.

No one has complained that Princess Kit and Prince Evil don't have English accents like everyone else? I find that a little shocking. It's such a minor nit to pick but I thought someone would have been picking at it by now.
 

MarkB

Legend
They have to be the dumbest characters ever. It's getting tedious for me. I like the show, but I feel I could love it with better writing.
It has moments I really like - subversions of expectations, strong character beats, excellent humour - but those are getting sparser and sparser as the episodes go on.
 


This is one of the things that makes it feel so D&D to me. The dialogue sounds like a bunch of players talking in-character, with all the odd mix of modernisms and traditional fantasy-world dialogue that entails.
And I love that, in the right fantasy property. No complaints from me about the Legend of Vox Machina, and I'll probably be fine with the upcoming D&D movie if it has a comparable tonal vibe because, as you say it feels very much like what a D&D table sounds like.

The trouble is that this is a sequel and revival to a movie that was basically a lighter, kid-friendlier remix of Lord of the Rings, and inherited from that both a veneer of silted, "ye olde grand fantasy epic" tone and a world that lacked the population size and cosmopolitan elements which might make different characters having wildly different speech patterns, some more modern than others, make sense.

At the end of the day my issue with the dialogue is not it being intrinsically bad, but rather that it often lands awkwardly in ways that pull me out of enjoying the show and shift me over to critiquing the show. A show that, on the basis of high nostalgia, high production values, a serviceable story, a likeable enough cast, and a lead reprising his iconic role, would otherwise keep me in constant enjoyment mode.
 


Given that Willow opens with a massacre of babies, and LotR opens with a birthday party, I'm not sure that is a strictly accurate appraisal.
I disagree, because viewing the works holistically rather than focusing on the opening I think it's clear which one was going out of its way to try to be appealing to eleven year olds. But I'm not going to debate the point, because it isn't really the point I was making, which is simply that the one work borrowed heavily from the other, in the process inheriting much of its general tonal vibe and setting feel, and that just as having characters who sound like 21st century Southern California teens show up in a piece of Tolkien media would be a bit disconcerting, so to it is (albeit to a lesser degree) with its spiritual cousin Willow.
 

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