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5E WotC Shares Theros Table of Contents

Russ Morrissey

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Parmandur

Legend
You think that a fey subclass isn't related to Planescape? You think that a Wildfire druid isn't related to planescape? Those are the most obvious ones ever! The Phantom Rogue references the Shadowfell and Shadar-Kai. True naming has always been connected to demons and devils. If those aren't planescape in theme, I'll eat my shoe.
The Phantom Rogue is the rewrite, and is definitely more Planescape than the Theros iteration.
 

dave2008

Legend
Demons and Devils are a key part of planescape.
But they are a key part of D&D and exist in most if not all of the settings and are integral to at least the Greyhawk, Forgotten Realms, and Nentir Vale settings as well. My point is that it is odd choice to claim as evidence for a planescape product.
 

But they are a key part of D&D and exist in most if not all of the settings and are integral to at least the Greyhawk, Forgotten Realms, and Nentir Vale settings as well. My point is that it is odd choice to claim as evidence for a planescape product.
If a subclass is themed around true naming, which is related to demons and devils, that points to a connection to the lower planes. That makes them connected with planescape, it doesn't really matter the setting of the world, because demons and devils are key to planescape.
 

Planescape is still divisive, decades later. I think it's very unlikely that:

A) WotC would put out a book with the name "Planescape" on it, and
B) WotC would put out a planar book that wasn't stuffed full of Planescape material

At this point, Sigil, the gate towns, the Great Modron March, etc., are all part of the Great Wheel cosmology (or the Great Wheel+, or whatever we're calling 5E's lightly tweaked Great Wheel).

It does seem very likely that WotC will be, at last, creating a planar sourcebook, including character content, whatever they call it.
 



Eltab

Hero
True naming has always been connected to demons and devils.
Truename magic is connected to those gods who created things by speaking them into being, as opposed to those gods who created things by crafting them out of raw materials.
Demons and Devils happen to be especially susceptible to the speaking of their true name, but any other creature can be affected by that also: in 3e you could utter your own true name to change yourself (to heal, boost attributes, and such).

I've thought of Truename magic as a subset of Divine Power, not as Planar-centered.
 

Parmandur

Legend
Planescape is still divisive, decades later. I think it's very unlikely that:

A) WotC would put out a book with the name "Planescape" on it, and
B) WotC would put out a planar book that wasn't stuffed full of Planescape material

At this point, Sigil, the gate towns, the Great Modron March, etc., are all part of the Great Wheel cosmology (or the Great Wheel+, or whatever we're calling 5E's lightly tweaked Great Wheel).

It does seem very likely that WotC will be, at last, creating a planar sourcebook, including character content, whatever they call it.
Planescape is the stealth default Setting of the game, as laid out in the PHB and DMG. I think that when they go there, the book will say "Planescape," which still has marketing caché from Torment, which just got rereleased on PS4 and Switch.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
You think that a fey subclass isn't related to Planescape? You think that a Wildfire druid isn't related to planescape? Those are the most obvious ones ever! The Phantom Rogue references the Shadowfell and Shadar-Kai. True naming has always been connected to demons and devils. If those aren't planescape in theme, I'll eat my shoe.
That is an incredible leap.
 

Dausuul

Legend
You think that a fey subclass isn't related to Planescape? You think that a Wildfire druid isn't related to planescape? Those are the most obvious ones ever! The Phantom Rogue references the Shadowfell and Shadar-Kai.
Huh? The Feywild and the Shadowfell were introduced in 4E. They have nothing whatsoever to do with Planescape. They weren't even part of the Great Wheel cosmology until 5E shoehorned them into it.
 

I'm pretty sure that it's a 5e feature that they can make books that can be stolen for parts. As Tyranny of Dragons can be used as a Dragonlance game, they could make a MtG Planeswalker book and expect people to use its features for Planescape, or a Deserts of Desolation book with the expectation that people might use it for Darksun.

Etc.
 

Huh? The Feywild and the Shadowfell were introduced in 4E. They have nothing whatsoever to do with Planescape. They weren't even part of the Great Wheel cosmology until 5E shoehorned them into it.
Planescape is not only the outer planes. The inner planes are a part of it, too. Even if they are newer planes, they're a part of planescape.
 

Planescape is the stealth default Setting of the game, as laid out in the PHB and DMG. I think that when they go there, the book will say "Planescape," which still has marketing caché from Torment, which just got rereleased on PS4 and Switch.
Why would they name it Planescape? 5e books have more flavorful titles than that.
 


I mean, they dropped the Onomancer according to the most recent UA, but I still think they were intending for it to be in Xanathar's 2.0, not Theros.
I don't think that they are going to do a Xanathar's 2 - at least not any time soon. They can develop extra subclasses, sure, but they can put them out a few at a time in various books that include more lore than crunch. I'd sooner expect "Whoever's Guide to the Planes" or "Caged in the City of Doors" before Xanather's 2, even by another name.
 

I don't think that they are going to do a Xanathar's 2 - at least not any time soon. They can develop extra subclasses, sure, but they can put them out a few at a time in various books that include more lore than crunch. I'd sooner expect "Whoever's Guide to the Planes" or "Caged in the City of Doors" before Xanather's 2, even by another name.
Xanathar's 2.0 would be a Planescape book. Do you know how long XGtE is? It's 192 pages. About 1/3rd of those are player options. The books have steadily been getting longer and longer in 5e. If they have 100ish pages of player options in a Planescape book, the rest of the 200 pages can be information on the planes.
They've playtested around 25 new subclasses. XGtE has 31, a few of which were not new. They can easily make a Planescape book be Xanathar's 2.0.

If they were to make a Xanathar's 2.0, what would they even fill the rest of the pages with? They're not going to make a PHB 2.0, so they would make it a combination of player and DM options. Information on the planes would fit perfectly here, and would fit with the theme of the subclasses and spells.
 

Planescape is still divisive, decades later. I think it's very unlikely that:

A) WotC would put out a book with the name "Planescape" on it, and
B) WotC would put out a planar book that wasn't stuffed full of Planescape material

At this point, Sigil, the gate towns, the Great Modron March, etc., are all part of the Great Wheel cosmology (or the Great Wheel+, or whatever we're calling 5E's lightly tweaked Great Wheel).

It does seem very likely that WotC will be, at last, creating a planar sourcebook, including character content, whatever they call it.
The gate towns and the Great Modron March predate Planescape - both were 1e vintage in conception, both in the original Manual of the Planes if I'm not mistaken.
 

Xanathar's 2.0 would be a Planescape book.
Okay. You know that's only in your head, right? By which I mean that there's no reason for anyone to assume you mean that when you say "Xanathar's 2.0" (I don't even understand why you put the 'point oh' in there). A Planescape book with subclasses is a Planescape book with subclasses. I mean, go ahead and think of that as 'Xanathar's 2.0' if you like, but it doesn't automatically mean that to me.
 

Huh? The Feywild and the Shadowfell were introduced in 4E. They have nothing whatsoever to do with Planescape. They weren't even part of the Great Wheel cosmology until 5E shoehorned them into it.
The Demiplane of Shadow and the Seelie Court are both 1e in vintage, and both were rather oddly situated in the planar geography of the time. The Demiplane of Shadow was often mentioned as the largest of the demiplanes, and was often hinted that it was, or was growing into, something greater than a mere demiplane. The Seelie Court was only lightly connected to the chaotic and good outer planes, and could temporarily manifest on any of a number of them, as well as having connections to the Prime Material. Both were covered fairly well under those names in various 2e Planescape products.

The Demiplane of Shadow got upgraded to a full plane (as the Plane of Shadow) in the 3e Manual of the Planes, and then was renamed to the Shadowfell in 4e. The Seelie Court got expanded and fully upgraded to a full plane as the Feywild in 4e as well...
 

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