Check Out This Preview of the Marvel Multiverse Role-Playing Game

On April 20th, the 120-page softcover playtest book for the new Marvel Multiverse Role-Playing Game by Matt Forbeck will be available to purchase for $9.99; the final game is due to be released next year, in 2023.

Marvel has revealed some of the playtest book, in which you use the new d616 system and profiles for Spider-Man, Captain America, Captain Marvel, Wolverine and more, in an introductory scenario called Enter: Hydra. The scenario involves a hostage situation at the Howard & Maria Stark Center for Galactic History.


The d616 system uses three d6s. Designer Matt Forbeck says "If you get a 1 on the Marvel die, you get a fantastic result and something amazing happens. If you get 6 on both of the other dice—or a 6-1-6 result—that’s an ultimate fantastic roll, which is even better."

marrpgptestrbtpb_int-7.jpg


The words MARVEL contains initials for the game's six ability scores -- Might, Agility, Resilience, Vigilance, Ego, and Logic. Each character has an archetype, such as a striker or blaster, and the archetype combines with the abilities to give bigger attack rolls.

Here's a quick look at Spider-Man! For reference a normal human stat is between -4 and +4.

marrpgptestrbtpb_int-12_0.jpg

 

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Russ Morrissey

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bulletmeat

Adventurer
I wonder if this will be 3d6+mod resolution where a 1 on the marvel die while 6 on one or two of the other die does something special.
 

Jer

Legend
Supporter
At the very least, the derived stats are pretty simple to calculate. Modifier appears to be entirely linear (with a 0 = +7), and Defense is just the Modifier +11.

I'm guessing that Spidey here is an example of a pretty high-leveled character (Rank 10, it seems?). I would hope that intro characters are quite a bit more simplified.
Why assume that something like an intro character exists?

Most folks play superhero games to be superheroes. Either to be Spider-man or to make up their own characters who are on the level of spider-man. Superhero games aren't usually level progression games because of that - even Mutants and Masterminds which started as a d20 based system had character power levels as a dial to turn not a level to attain.

The superhero games that tried to ape D&D with some kind of progression from low power to high power have never caught on. Because they're a bad fit for the genre. The genre is that one day you could get bit by a radioactive mongoose and suddenly become a hero who is at the same power level as Spider-man or Iron man right from the start. I'd assume that just about any character you make would be as complex as Spider-man.
 

I wonder if this will be 3d6+mod resolution where a 1 on the marvel die while 6 on one or two of the other die does something special.

It does not sound like the dice are added together, as the opening post quotes from the article itself:

"The d616 system uses three d6s. Designer Matt Forbeck says "If you get a 1 on the Marvel die, you get a fantastic result and something amazing happens. If you get 6 on both of the other dice—or a 6-1-6 result—that’s an ultimate fantastic roll, which is even better."
 

Why assume that something like an intro character exists?

The article says power levels from Squirrel-Girl to Captain Marvel, so there will definitely be lower powered heroes than Spider Man. Plus we get to make our own characters with the playtest, not just play pregens, so that will help a lot.
 

bulletmeat

Adventurer
It does not sound like the dice are added together, as the opening post quotes from the article itself:

"The d616 system uses three d6s. Designer Matt Forbeck says "If you get a 1 on the Marvel die, you get a fantastic result and something amazing happens. If you get 6 on both of the other dice—or a 6-1-6 result—that’s an ultimate fantastic roll, which is even better."
This quote is what makes me think so:

"an accessible and easy-to-learn system for newcomers to tabletop RPGs and a natural evolution for those familiar with the most popular tabletop role-playing games on the market."
 

I love the lore, but I would rather the system used by Onyx Path for Aberrant.

My doubt is how to design encounters if PCs have got different rank or levels. A street-vigilante isn't like a cosmic champion. The sentinels, the mutant-hunter robots, could be too powerful or too weak for different PCs.

Other point is if some munchkin players want to use high-tech and superpowers.
 

Undrave

Hero
Ah yes, the Spider-Strike power. Everyone knows what that is. Very intuitive.

With every new supers game that tries (yet again) to atomize the experience into a massive pile of numbers and endless lists of specific powers, the more I appreciate the genius of Masks.
I also appreciate the simplicity of Cartoon Action Hour...
 

Doing a little poking around the Net right now and so far I am seeing this will be available for Kindle, Nook, and the Google Play Books app, though the Google one is $11, instead of $10. They just gotta get their percent of the sale, but I might get that version anyway, so I can read it on any Android device and take it with me on my phone.

I also see it for pre-order from Target and Barnes & Noble, for people without a local comics shop to buy it from and who don't want to order it by mail.
 

The system looks like a vaguely simplified version of Champions where you are rolling high, rather than low.

For the attributes, I’d imagine if you were to multiply the scores by five, they’d end up being equivalent to the Champions score - so 2 would be a baseline of 10, 7 would be 35.

It also has shades of Green Ronin's Adventure Game Engine.
 

MarkB

Legend
At the very least, the derived stats are pretty simple to calculate. Modifier appears to be entirely linear (with a 0 = +7), and Defense is just the Modifier +11.
And the number of spaces a character can move seems to be their speed divided by 5, rounded to whole numbers.
It does not sound like the dice are added together, as the opening post quotes from the article itself:

"The d616 system uses three d6s. Designer Matt Forbeck says "If you get a 1 on the Marvel die, you get a fantastic result and something amazing happens. If you get 6 on both of the other dice—or a 6-1-6 result—that’s an ultimate fantastic roll, which is even better."
Given the size of the modifiers, I'd expect it to be 3d6 + modifier. If it were something like "roll 3d6, pick highest result", the variable die result would be overwhelmed by the modifiers.
 


MarkB

Legend
Basically, it's a game with six ability scores, from which you derive both modifiers and defenses, and multiple movement modes in some unit of distance, which you divide in order to work out how many squares you can move.

So far, so D&D.
 

Lord Shark

Explorer
Looking at the powers, I wonder exactly is the difference between Webcasting, Webgrabbing, Webslinging, and Webtrapping, and why you would need to break down "slings webs" into several different abilities.

I assume Spider-Dodge and Mighty 1 reflect superhuman levels of Agility and Might?

Also, movement is broken into spaces? I hope they don't expect us to run superhero combats on a 5-square-foot grid...
 



Jer

Legend
Supporter
Looking at this cover art shown:
View attachment 155197
the blank character in the foreground suggests "you can make your own hero."
Make your own hero isn't the same as an intro character.

You can make your own hero in every superhero RPG out there - depending on the power level of the game you might be making a peer to Superman or to Daredevil. But you don't typically start out as Daredevil and work your way up to Superman by leveling - the power level and complexity of your character pretty much starts at one level and stays roughly there for a whole campaign (you might gain more breadth or have a slight power up, but nothing like the D&D improvement curve).
 

Rabulias

the Incomparably Shrewd and Clever
Make your own hero isn't the same as an intro character.

You can make your own hero in every superhero RPG out there - depending on the power level of the game you might be making a peer to Superman or to Daredevil. But you don't typically start out as Daredevil and work your way up to Superman by leveling - the power level and complexity of your character pretty much starts at one level and stays roughly there for a whole campaign (you might gain more breadth or have a slight power up, but nothing like the D&D improvement curve).
You may be right, but I think there will be a segment of the audience that will want to have a way to improve their hero, be it an original creation, or one of the established Marvel heroes. And I think this parallels plot points in the comics and films. Iron Man is a prime example, building improved versions of his armor. Spider-Man comes up with new ways to use his webbing. The Hulk can integrate Bruce Banner's mind with Hulk's strength. I think the game will at least provide an option for character advancement/improvement. Some of this can be more than just slight power ups.
 

overgeeked

B/X Known World
I wonder if this will be 3d6+mod resolution where a 1 on the marvel die while 6 on one or two of the other die does something special.
That's what they've said. In that linked preview no less. 3d6 is the standard resolution mechanic. One die is the Marvel die. If you roll double sixes on the regular dice and a 1 on the Marvel die, something amazing happens. Hence the "d616 System".
 

overgeeked

B/X Known World
Ah yes, the Spider-Strike power. Everyone knows what that is. Very intuitive.

With every new supers game that tries (yet again) to atomize the experience into a massive pile of numbers and endless lists of specific powers, the more I appreciate the genius of Masks.
It really is a great game. Even with the buckets of dice you need, MHR still looks like a better game than this. I'm sure it'll have fans, but the last thing I want from a superheroes game is another clunky, cruchy mess of a behemoth.
 

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