Cubicle 7 Also Announces A New 'C7d20' System

Joining Paizo (which has hinted at plans to update Pathfinder), Kobold Press (with it's Black Flag project), MCDM (which is working on a new game), and--of course--Level Up: Advanced 5th Edition (which was released last year), Cubicle 7 has announced a new C7d20 System.

You heard it here first! C7d20, our brand new system, is in development. Building on the great d20 games we know and love, our system will offer all the exciting action-packed adventures players expect from a d20 fantasy game, as well as the broader styles of gaming that we’ve brought to 5e in Doctors and Daleks, Adventures in Middle-earth, and Uncharted Journeys.

C7d20 will be a complete rule set that is compatible with 5e — you’ll be able to use all of your favourite 5e books and supplements, including Uncharted Journeys and Broken Weave. A core rulebook for C7d20 will launch later this year and you’ll be able to see hints of what is to come when Broken Weave launches. We’re involved in discussions about open licensing and will have more news on this as the situation develops.


C7d20_Announcement.jpg
 

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Emmetation

Explorer
I'm glad that you guys are taking this with humour and grace! I was a big fan of your Journey system in AiME (in fact, I ported it to my home Level Up game!), and I love Doctor Who, so I hope you guys end up making fantastic products in whichever system suits you best!
Thanks! Honestly it probably doesn't change a whole lot for us. Oh and if you like the Journey rules from AiME you should check out Uncharted Journeys. We've hugely improved and expanded on what we created in AiME
 


Von Ether

Legend
Cleansing, it was called thirty years ago.


Sarajevan reader here. I find the use of the term not offensive, but highly problematic. It was coined to be incredibly pejorative by cultures with long histories of colonization through cultural hegemony. Other words could be used to better effect and with less ideological baggage. And that term carries a world war and several genocides in its luggage.

Personally, I'm not in favor of hindering the use of any language, just the education and self-awareness of its use. ...
Thank you for your time and insight on this subject.

Speaking of hyperbole, my cynicism would say your post should have imploded the Internet, such as it is these days.
 


Sarajevan reader here. I find the use of the term not offensive, but highly problematic. It was coined to be incredibly pejorative by cultures with long histories of colonization through cultural hegemony.

I'll have to put this word on the list to discuss in a graduate class I'm guest lecturing in this semester about cultural referencing and cross-cultural depictions. A few phrases, a novel and it's film adaptation, a couple of songs, and some rpg material are on the docket.

Re: Balkan-inspired RPG materials, you might want to to check out Bruce Heard's City-States (from the Savage Coast/Red Steel subsetting of the World of Mystara) and the neighboring Goat-Men of Kavaja (which I believe he mostly wrote after leaving TSR: Goatmen of the Kavaja). All of which are based on cultures of the Balkan Mountains / SE Europe.

After he left TSR, I asked him about the explicit Real World correspondences:


Last year, I made a whole section on Eastern European D&D motifs in my "Real World Cultures of the D&D Multiverse" chart:


What do you think? Is this relevant to your graduate class?
 

Teo Twawki

Coffee ruminator
What do you think? Is this relevant to your graduate class?
That's a rather exhaustive examination of the equivalencies in what amounts to a single game, and would be worthy of an academic examination, to be sure. But since I'm only guest lecturing in someone else's class, I wouldn't have final say in adding it. The focus isn't rpgs specifically, merely finding medias with cross-cultural authorship (one ethnicity or demographic writing about another; examples from literature and music: those Brit metal heads teach more about American history in 4 minutes than all the years of middle & high school!), cultural assumptions about various media and history ("Me & Julio" is about what!? / that's not a pro-Confederate song, it's written by a First Nation Canadian Jew), the dichotomy of railing against one perceived transgression while rationalizing and/or ignoring others (racist author I don't like so must be bad / oh, I like it, can't be racist), and why, especially in an institution of learning, some cultures are openly criticized, while others are deemed taboo to discuss.

My personal goal--sure as it is--would be the same as when I was teaching at University: to teach how to turn off personal judgments to experience something in full and then, afterward, critically examine it for validity and benefit. Even crappy-art and racist-material has its value in educating the reader/viewer, if nothing else, to show what to avoid and do better. And, I hope to continue the debate of can an artist produce "good" art of lasting value if they are concerned about offended anyone... but I digress. Constantly. :p

Given the professor, myself, and about a fifth of the class are not US-born and is incredibly diverse, the discussion is probably going to have a less predictable trajectory than one of mostly homogenic US-students. This is not a denigrative projection, just an observable theory.

Your link could serve as a foundation for a semester of study. And I will pass it along. Cultural depictions in tabletop and video games is a topic of interest for the reigning (and tenured, which means they can get away with topics the non-tenured cannot) professor. Thanks for pointing it out to me. And your Balkan-related suggestions.
 

That's a rather exhaustive examination of the equivalencies in what amounts to a single game, and would be worthy of an academic examination, to be sure. But since I'm only guest lecturing in someone else's class, I wouldn't have final say in adding it. The focus isn't rpgs specifically, merely finding medias with cross-cultural authorship (one ethnicity or demographic writing about another; examples from literature and music: those Brit metal heads teach more about American history in 4 minutes than all the years of middle & high school!), cultural assumptions about various media and history ("Me & Julio" is about what!? / that's not a pro-Confederate song, it's written by a First Nation Canadian Jew), the dichotomy of railing against one perceived transgression while rationalizing and/or ignoring others (racist author I don't like so must be bad / oh, I like it, can't be racist), and why, especially in an institution of learning, some cultures are openly criticized, while others are deemed taboo to discuss.

My personal goal--sure as it is--would be the same as when I was teaching at University: to teach how to turn off personal judgments to experience something in full and then, afterward, critically examine it for validity and benefit. Even crappy-art and racist-material has its value in educating the reader/viewer, if nothing else, to show what to avoid and do better. And, I hope to continue the debate of can an artist produce "good" art of lasting value if they are concerned about offended anyone... but I digress. Constantly. :p

Given the professor, myself, and about a fifth of the class are not US-born and is incredibly diverse, the discussion is probably going to have a less predictable trajectory than one of mostly homogenic US-students. This is not a denigrative projection, just an observable theory.

Your link could serve as a foundation for a semester of study. And I will pass it along. Cultural depictions in tabletop and video games is a topic of interest for the reigning (and tenured, which means they can get away with topics the non-tenured cannot) professor. Thanks for pointing it out to me. And your Balkan-related suggestions.
P.S. No reply necessary -- but here is the earlier thread on the Mystara Piazza where I and others sussed out the origins of SE European placenames in the Grand Duchy of Karameikos and the City-States within the World of Mystara:


Poster "Agathokles" found that the name "Zvornik" is Bosnian. Maybe the only explicitly Bosnian reference in the whole D&D Multiverse. (?)
 

Teo Twawki

Coffee ruminator
Poster "Agathokles" found that the name "Zvornik" is Bosnian. Maybe the only explicitly Bosnian reference in the whole D&D Multiverse. (?)

Zvornik was a beautiful little town split across an epic river. But, political geography after the war being what it is, it's not Bosnia these days; it's in Republika Srpska. Which is a very, very different place than BiH.
 

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