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D&D 5E Sane Magic Item Prices

tetrasodium

Legend
Supporter
How far do you think large flying creatures should be able to travel in a day? I generally feel 60-70 miles feels too little; something in the 90-200 miles range seems ok to me. My suggestion above that a 5e adult dragon should have a sustained overland flight rate of around 40 mph might indicate more like 320 miles in a day, though.

I guess a flying carpet doing say 20 mph would be maybe 12 hours of flight before it got too uncomfortable (is a carpet better or worse than a car?) would do ca 240 miles/day.
It depends a lot on how efficient their flight is. Birds start out kind of sprinting equivalent a lot of the time when we see them flapping lots but long distances is different . Apparently an albatross can do about 500 miles in a day
 

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Lanefan

Victoria Rules
How far do you think large flying creatures should be able to travel in a day? I generally feel 60-70 miles feels too little; something in the 90-200 miles range seems ok to me. My suggestion above that a 5e adult dragon should have a sustained overland flight rate of around 40 mph might indicate more like 320 miles in a day, though.
I'd say something like a big dragon should be easily able to cover a few hundred miles in a day without much effort, or more - maybe 600 miles - if it pushes itself, but it wouldn't be able to sustain that for more than a day.

A dragon power-diving down onto a city should be easily able to get to 70 mph or more* during the dive. Climb speed won't be nearly as good, though. :)

* - hence the risk of serious injury should it mess up and crash land, and why it'd be stupid to do this in the dark or thick fog.
I guess a flying carpet doing say 20 mph would be maybe 12 hours of flight before it got too uncomfortable (is a carpet better or worse than a car?) would do ca 240 miles/day.
I don't have flying carpets be quite that fast but they can go 24/7 provided somebody's awake on board to act as pilot. As for comfort: on a carpet, unless it's full of people, you can lie down and stretch out - even take a nap if you somehow tie yourself to the thing so you don't roll off - which you can't really do in any comfort in a car.
 

Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
I'd say something like a big dragon should be easily able to cover a few hundred miles in a day without much effort, or more - maybe 600 miles - if it pushes itself, but it wouldn't be able to sustain that for more than a day.

A dragon power-diving down onto a city should be easily able to get to 70 mph or more* during the dive. Climb speed won't be nearly as good, though. :)

* - hence the risk of serious injury should it mess up and crash land, and why it'd be stupid to do this in the dark or thick fog.

I don't have flying carpets be quite that fast but they can go 24/7 provided somebody's awake on board to act as pilot. As for comfort: on a carpet, unless it's full of people, you can lie down and stretch out - even take a nap if you somehow tie yourself to the thing so you don't roll off - which you can't really do in any comfort in a car.
Tell that to these people
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Stattick

Explorer
How far do you think large flying creatures should be able to travel in a day? I generally feel 60-70 miles feels too little; something in the 90-200 miles range seems ok to me. My suggestion above that a 5e adult dragon should have a sustained overland flight rate of around 40 mph might indicate more like 320 miles in a day, though.

I guess a flying carpet doing say 20 mph would be maybe 12 hours of flight before it got too uncomfortable (is a carpet better or worse than a car?) would do ca 240 miles/day.
Carpet would be a lot worse than a car. You'd be far more prone to windburn, sunburn, cold, dehydration, glare, and sitting for long periods in uncomfortable positions.
 

Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
When it comes to the flight speed of dragons, you have a couple of options. One is that the speed they have is their normal "walking" speed. The speed that they use when they need to maneuver and engage in combat. That gives us 9 MPH at a slow steady speed which is significantly faster than humans.

But this is flying. Assuming they glide they can probably dash/run for long periods to double their speed. That gets you to 18 MPH. Significantly faster than any way humans would be able to travel barring magic or technology not normally associated with D&D levels of technology.

While dragons are magic and can break the sound barrier if you want them to (do they have afterburners?), I'd compare them to birds for speed. Geese fly at around 40 MPH, albatrosses 50 MPH. I'm discounting diving speeds of birds of prey because that's not sustainable.

But what if we look at a flying creature that's even bigger? Well, pterosaurs may have flown at 80 MPH.

So all I can really say is that when doing long distance flying, they fly as fast as you want them to fly. They're flying because of magic and can ignore the massive not particularly aerodynamic shape through the air with wings that make no sense after all. Personally? I'd probably put it closer to the 80 MPH for long distance travel.

But when it comes to combat engagements? Reserving enough energy to recharge breath weapons, maneuver and potentially attack? Then it's 80 feet every 6 seconds or so. 🤷‍♂️
 


Stattick

Explorer
When it comes to the flight speed of dragons, you have a couple of options. One is that the speed they have is their normal "walking" speed. The speed that they use when they need to maneuver and engage in combat. That gives us 9 MPH at a slow steady speed which is significantly faster than humans.

But this is flying. Assuming they glide they can probably dash/run for long periods to double their speed. That gets you to 18 MPH. Significantly faster than any way humans would be able to travel barring magic or technology not normally associated with D&D levels of technology.

While dragons are magic and can break the sound barrier if you want them to (do they have afterburners?), I'd compare them to birds for speed. Geese fly at around 40 MPH, albatrosses 50 MPH. I'm discounting diving speeds of birds of prey because that's not sustainable.

But what if we look at a flying creature that's even bigger? Well, pterosaurs may have flown at 80 MPH.

So all I can really say is that when doing long distance flying, they fly as fast as you want them to fly. They're flying because of magic and can ignore the massive not particularly aerodynamic shape through the air with wings that make no sense after all. Personally? I'd probably put it closer to the 80 MPH for long distance travel.

But when it comes to combat engagements? Reserving enough energy to recharge breath weapons, maneuver and potentially attack? Then it's 80 feet every 6 seconds or so. 🤷‍♂️
The other option is for dragons to do strafing runs at speed. They fly over at 60 mph, use their breath weapon, maybe snatch a snack off the back of a horse, and then won't be back for another minute or two, if they come back at all.
 

S'mon

Legend
The other option is for dragons to do strafing runs at speed. They fly over at 60 mph, use their breath weapon, maybe snatch a snack off the back of a horse, and then won't be back for another minute or two, if they come back at all.
Yeah, I think that needs to be handled away from the grid-based 3e/4e/5e combat system.
 

Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
The other option is for dragons to do strafing runs at speed. They fly over at 60 mph, use their breath weapon, maybe snatch a snack off the back of a horse, and then won't be back for another minute or two, if they come back at all.
That could be cool, but at what point do you sacrifice accuracy? Imagine driving down the highway at 60 MPH and trying to hit a road side with a paint gun, even one that fires multiple pellets. While driving. In addition, as tough as dragons are, they do have long necks. If they're even slightly off on grabbing that snack and accidentally hit the ground with their lower jaw, they're going to have a really bad day.

All depends on the fiction of course. An eagle snatching a fish is probably going around 20-30 MPH, but in part that's because unlike dragons they have to rely solely on the lift provided by their wings; they have to maintain that speed to stay aloft. Even then, they can only lift about 10 pounds.
 

S'mon

Legend
That could be cool, but at what point do you sacrifice accuracy? Imagine driving down the highway at 60 MPH and trying to hit a road side with a paint gun, even one that fires multiple pellets. While driving. In addition, as tough as dragons are, they do have long necks. If they're even slightly off on grabbing that snack and accidentally hit the ground with their lower jaw, they're going to have a really bad day.

All depends on the fiction of course. An eagle snatching a fish is probably going around 20-30 MPH, but in part that's because unlike dragons they have to rely solely on the lift provided by their wings; they have to maintain that speed to stay aloft. Even then, they can only lift about 10 pounds.

I'd expect the snatch would be by claws not teeth.
 

SkidAce

Hero
Supporter
That could be cool, but at what point do you sacrifice accuracy? Imagine driving down the highway at 60 MPH and trying to hit a road side with a paint gun, even one that fires multiple pellets. While driving. In addition, as tough as dragons are, they do have long necks. If they're even slightly off on grabbing that snack and accidentally hit the ground with their lower jaw, they're going to have a really bad day.

All depends on the fiction of course. An eagle snatching a fish is probably going around 20-30 MPH, but in part that's because unlike dragons they have to rely solely on the lift provided by their wings; they have to maintain that speed to stay aloft. Even then, they can only lift about 10 pounds.
You apparently never grew up (and probably shouldn't have) driving down the road throwing beer bottles out the driver's side window over the car roof and hitting speed signs.

Much to current me's shame.
 


Stattick

Explorer
Yeah, I think that needs to be handled away from the grid-based 3e/4e/5e combat system.
You could hack something together pretty easily, probably not suitable for something on the fly though. A strafe at 66 mph would be about 600 feet per round if I didn't screw up the math. So for PCs with long distance attacks (long bows, spell snipers, etc), they could get in two attacks. For PCs with ranged attacks of more moderate distance, one attack. You'd just want to make sure that you had assigned more realistic flight speeds to other things, and had the ability to quickly look up flight speeds for things no on your list. You'd also want to make sure you knew how to handle likely shenanigans the PCs might try (I'm going to dimension door with the barbarian onto the dragon's back...! I'm going to polymorph into a griffon and try to grapple the flying dragon...! Gust of Wind to try to knock him out of the sky!)

After a brief flurry, let the PCs reposition, and prep for the next strafe, assuming the dragon comes back and that they're not chasing it somehow. Drop any spells of short duration, ask if anyone needs multiple rounds for anything. Decide how long it is until the dragon returns, and then do it all over again.
 

Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
I'd expect the snatch would be by claws not teeth.
Same issue. Off a little bit and you still face plant. That and the bite has better reach.

In any case, this is house rule territory so do what makes sense to you.
 

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