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D&D General There's A New Dragonlance Novel Coming

After all the legal drama between WotC, Margaret Weis, and Tracy Hickman recently, this probably won't surprise anybody. However, on Amazon, there is now a placeholder for a Dragonlance paperback novel set for a 29th July release this year.

The 2020 lawsuit referred to a trilogy - Dragons of Deceit, Dragons of Fate, and a third book.

dragonlance_featured.0.png


As expected, it's by Weis and Hickman, and being published by Del Rey which is the sci-fi and fantasy imprint of Penguin Random House. It's 304 pages. And that's pretty much all we know!

After the lawsuit was dropped, Margaret Weis tweeted that exciting news was coming; it looks like this is that exciting news.

Dragonlance is a legacy D&D setting and best-selling novel series created in the mid-1980s by TSR, the then-owners of Dungeons & Dragons.
 

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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey

Marc_C

Solo Role Playing
But anyway, it does interest me how the Chronicles and Legends seemed so formative and high quality and after the later works by Weis and Hickman still seemed good to me, but lacked that spark or energy. I wonder if this observation is more a function of the zeitgeist of the time, me changing as a reader, a slackening of the creative energy or a mélange of the above.
Good question. I know I've changed as a reader. Tried reading the first trilogy this summer, put the book down after a few chapters. I won't buy the new DL novels.
 

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Stormonu

Legend
I never got to the Dragons of Summer Flame and beyond, but I have enjoyed the likes of Dragons of the Dwarven Depths that covered the "other half" of the original trilogy.

Wonder where in the timeline the book will be set.
 


6ENow!

The Game Is Over
Obviously not. Lawyers tend to take their jobs more seriously than that.
You don't know that.

Lawyers get paid either way. And they aren't the ones who decide to settle, withdraw a suit, etc. The client does that and the lawyer executes the client's wishes to the best of their ability (hopefully).
 

Backcountry164

Explorer
Nope. Completely serious. You think people/ companies haven't worked out such things in the past to their mutual benefit?
The lawsuit made WotC look like trash. Again obviously, no company is going to put themselves in a negative light for publicity that they wouldn't remotely need. They're resurrecting a popular series from decades ago. What on Earth makes you think they'd need a publicity stunt to generate interest??
 



6ENow!

The Game Is Over
The lawsuit made WotC look like trash. Again obviously, no company is going to put themselves in a negative light for publicity that they wouldn't remotely need. They're resurrecting a popular series from decades ago. What on Earth makes you think they'd need a publicity stunt to generate interest??
What makes you think the lawsuit made WotC look like trash?

Personally, I couldn't care less about the whole thing. I barely found the Dragonlance novels enjoyable at all and would never read them again--they aren't that great IMO--and I wouldn't suggest them to anyone interested in D&D, either.

What on Earth makes you think they'd need a publicity stunt to generate interest??
Because it was "decades ago". :rolleyes:

Nope. Lawyers have a set of ethics and rules that they are expected to follow. No legitimate lawyer would participate in anything like this.
No one said the lawyers are "in on it". Jeez...

I was going to explain all the reasons this wouldn't make sense.

But then I decided, y'know what? That's silly. You're the one asserting the outlandish theory, it's on you to put forward some tiny shred of evidence for it.
Not really because I don't care about it. It is everyone responding to my posts that keeps it going and I find that silly. ;)
 



Backcountry164

Explorer
What makes you think the lawsuit made WotC look like trash?

Personally, I couldn't care less about the whole thing. I barely found the Dragonlance novels enjoyable at all and would never read them again--they aren't that great IMO--and I wouldn't suggest them to anyone interested in D&D, either.


Because it was "decades ago". :rolleyes:


No one said the lawyers are "in on it". Jeez...


Not really because I don't care about it. It is everyone responding to my posts that keeps it going and I find that silly. ;)
Dude, the idea that a mega corporation like Hasbro needs to pull publicity stunts is so far beyond ridiculous that it's hard to take you seriously.
And for someone who supposedly doesn't care you sure are spending a lot of time defending your crazy comment...
 


6ENow!

The Game Is Over
Dude, the idea that a mega corporation like Hasbro needs to pull publicity stunts is so far beyond ridiculous that it's hard to take you seriously.
And for someone who supposedly doesn't care you sure are spending a lot of time defending your crazy comment...
Dude, you are the one who keeps bringing it up... I'm not even defending it anymore because it's my opinion and has nothing to do with you. All I can think of is you must be a big fan of the series. shrug
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
You don't know that.

Lawyers get paid either way.

Dude, the idea that a mega corporation like Hasbro needs to pull publicity stunts is so far beyond ridiculous that it's hard to take you seriously.

Mod Note:
Dudes. Don't make a serious argument out of unfounded suggestion that others were engaged in a marketing stunt.

Drop it. Now. Thanks.
 


DaveMage

Slumbering in Tsar
But anyway, it does interest me how the Chronicles and Legends seemed so formative and high quality and after the later works by Weis and Hickman still seemed good to me, but lacked that spark or energy. I wonder if this observation is more a function of the zeitgeist of the time, me changing as a reader, a slackening of the creative energy or a mélange of the above.
Same here.

I absolutely loved Chronicles and Legends as a teenager (3+ decades ago). The novels after those weren't awful, but they did lack the "spark and energy" (as you say) for me as well.

Maybe it was the character of Raistlin that was the best part of the original trilogies for me. Once he was no longer a major player, the novels were less interesting.
 

Back in the day I made it as far as the three trilogies (War of the Lance, Legends, Tales) and some of the associated one-offs. For the longest time for me, that was where Dragonlance began and ended for me. I've started trying to get caught up on the subsequent main trilogies of late, but am nowhere near current with them yet. If there is going to be new Dragonlance game content (and that's still a big if), it's likely going to take place in "current" Dragonlance, of which I only have the vaguest idea of right now.

its been a long time and I honestly didn't read all of the lance books that came after the twins series.

304 pages is half the page count of Dragons of Summer Flame. A tighter tale is probably a good thing, though.
 

Ath-kethin

Elder Thing
Actually, after the War of Souls came the Dark Disciple trilogy, beginning with Amber and Ashes.
True, but that's a Margaret Weis solo series. I'm splitting hairs here a bit, but I still stick to a firm "only the Weis & Hickman works are canon" approach.

Which gets tricky in the post-Chaos War era, admittedly, but c'est la vie.
 

I thought the publicity-stunt comment was a joke.
I highly doubt that WotC or W&H are going to have throngs of new people waiting on bated breath as a result of the publicity stunt. I'd assume the audience for this book is mostly people that have read the old novels.
 

beholdsa

Explorer
True, but that's a Margaret Weis solo series. I'm splitting hairs here a bit, but I still stick to a firm "only the Weis & Hickman works are canon" approach.

Which gets tricky in the post-Chaos War era, admittedly, but c'est la vie.
That's fair. But I also want to point out that the two Draconian books by Weis & Perrin were excellent! (and were referenced in the War of the Souls trilogy.)
 

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