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D&D General There's A New Dragonlance Novel Coming

After all the legal drama between WotC, Margaret Weis, and Tracy Hickman recently, this probably won't surprise anybody. However, on Amazon, there is now a placeholder for a Dragonlance paperback novel set for a 29th July release this year.

The 2020 lawsuit referred to a trilogy - Dragons of Deceit, Dragons of Fate, and a third book.

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As expected, it's by Weis and Hickman, and being published by Del Rey which is the sci-fi and fantasy imprint of Penguin Random House. It's 304 pages. And that's pretty much all we know!

After the lawsuit was dropped, Margaret Weis tweeted that exciting news was coming; it looks like this is that exciting news.

Dragonlance is a legacy D&D setting and best-selling novel series created in the mid-1980s by TSR, the then-owners of Dungeons & Dragons.
 

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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey


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Parmandur

Legend
Yes very short by today's standards, but also quite short by earlier Dragonlance novel standards - the first one is 448 pages, and most are around 400 pages.

Not really looking forward to it, I have to say. Pretty much everything that was ever cool about Dragonlance got trashed in one of the (many) later novels.

My expectations are low, but my interest is piqued. I am happy that the legal action was resolved amicably, that left a bad taste in my mouth.
 




I think this all but confirms that tomorrow's setting announcement is 5e Dragonlance.
There have been a lot of Dragonlance novels. Since the 1980s, they have rarely coincided with the release of new Dragonlance product.

Tomorrow's announcement could be dragons, could be Dragonlance, could be Planescape, could be Manual of the Planes, could be an undead book, could be a Magic the Gathering book, it could be the WotC My Little Pony RPG. There's enough tea leaves around to make anything possible.

It's also possible -- and hear me out here, folks -- that it'll be something completely surprising until Amazon pulls an Amazon.
 

Not that any of you care, but "Innerdude's Official Dragonlance Canon" is exactly 8 novels:

  • Autumn Twilight / Winter Night / Spring Dawning
  • Time / War / Test of the Twins
  • Legend of Huma + Kaz the Minotaur
Even that is a product more of nostalgia remembering what it was like reading them for the first time at age 14 than on the actual merits of the writing.

Everything else I would categorize as "legends," in the same vein as Disney relegating all of the Star Wars expanded universe novels to "legends." I read Dragons of Summer Flame and the War of Souls trilogy. Very much "meh."

As such, I find myself with barely a flicker of excitement at new Dragonlance novels.

The best writing Weis and Hickman ever produced were the 3rd and 4th novels of the Death Gate cycle, Fire Sea and Serpent Mage respectively. Fire Sea to this day is easily in my top 10 fantasy novels ever. The world building in that novel was spectacular beyond belief, and Jonathan the Lazar is an unbelievably cool character concept.
 

vecna00

Explorer
I'm mostly just happy we're getting more novels, I think it's good for the hobby in general and I'll at least try reading it, time permitting.
 

Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
There have been a lot of Dragonlance novels. Since the 1980s, they have rarely coincided with the release of new Dragonlance product.

Tomorrow's announcement could be dragons, could be Dragonlance, could be Planescape, could be Manual of the Planes, could be an undead book, could be a Magic the Gathering book, it could be the WotC My Little Pony RPG. There's enough tea leaves around to make anything possible.

It's also possible -- and hear me out here, folks -- that it'll be something completely surprising until Amazon pulls an Amazon.

Totally with you here; there's a lot of things tomorrow can be based on the hints we have, leaving us almost back at square one!
 

vecna00

Explorer
Tomorrow's announcement has already been leaked and posted in the other thread. Mind you, there still could be the novel announcement, but doubtful at this point. It probably won't be officially announced until around May.
 


Nostalgia absolutely is a huge part of the feelings for Dragonlance, I'd say. My first AD&D character was a Dark Elf because I thought Dalamar was cool. I did enjoy Flint the King, for its dwarven-centric content, though I imagine the Gully Dwarf stuff hasn't aged well. In general, the farther you get from that original trilogy, the less exciting it gets for me.

We'll see what happens with this next book. I'll probably pick it up out of curiosity's sake, if the reviews are decent. It looks like it's been just over a decade since the last Dragonlance-branded novel was released.

Not that any of you care, but "Innerdude's Official Dragonlance Canon" is exactly 8 novels:

  • Autumn Twilight / Winter Night / Spring Dawning
  • Time / War / Test of the Twins
  • Legend of Huma + Kaz the Minotaur
Even that is a product more of nostalgia remembering what it was like reading them for the first time at age 14 than on the actual merits of the writing.
 

Sunsword

Adventurer
But anyway, it does interest me how the Chronicles and Legends seemed so formative and high quality and after the later works by Weis and Hickman still seemed good to me, but lacked that spark or energy. I wonder if this observation is more a function of the zeitgeist of the time, me changing as a reader, a slackening of the creative energy or a mélange of the above.
The problem is that fans always say they want something original yet new works are often lower sellers than the original product. It's a tough situation for creators and fans.
 

The problem is that fans always say they want something original yet new works are often lower sellers than the original product. It's a tough situation for creators and fans.
I wonder how much of Krynn was plotted out in advance. Reading the original novels, it very much feels like the entire setting was built around one point in time -- the War of the Lance -- and that everything else has been vamping.

Compare to Middle Earth or Westeros, both of which have deep, broad histories and lots of places we could zoom in and out of and tell interesting stories. (Westeros more than Middle Earth, for my money, but it's true of both.)

Now, lots of writers get themselves in trouble with this -- no one really gives a crap about your massive series bible if you can't manage the basics of telling an interesting story with compelling characters -- but once you're staring down the barrel of (oh my god) 181 books, world design matters.
 
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Ath-kethin

Elder Thing
That's fair. But I also want to point out that the two Draconian books by Weis & Perrin were excellent! (and were referenced in the War of the Souls trilogy.)
Oh, I've read tons of DL novels - both the terrible obviously-repurposed-quickly-from-another-setting ones (remember the one with the half-orc in it? Seriously.) and the excellent ones, and the in between ones.

It's not that I feel only the Weis & Hickman ones are good, it's just that if I have to pick something to read a chapter or so per night or two, I'm gonna stick with the main (meta)plot.

Plus, I already own them all 😁.
 

EthanSental

Adventurer
I read the novels back in the 80s and have been listening to them on my commute on audible app. Overall I still enjoy them and the story and Paul Boemer does a great job with the voices. One thing that still stings/odd is the Tanis Half elven naming used through out the book trilogy. I’ll pick them up...audible more than likely.
 

I have conflicted feelings about this. Thus far, I have been very impressed with the quality and standards of the 5th edition WoTC materials, thus, publishing separately makes me wonder about the rigor and frankly likability of this new work. We shall see!

Hate to be a pessimist, but does this signal as well a lower degree of likelihood that WoTC will publish an official DL campaign setting this year?
Isn't R.A. Salvatore also basically publishing seperately these days?
 

jerryrice4949

Adventurer
I wonder how much of Krynn was plotted out in advance. Reading the original novels, it very much feels like the entire setting was built around one point in time -- the War of the Lance -- and that everything else has been vamping.

Compare to Middle Earth or Westeros, both of which have deep, broad histories and lots of places we could zoom in and out of and tell interesting stories. (Westeros more than Middle Earth, for my money, but it's true of both.)

Now, lots of writers get themselves in trouble with this -- no one really gives a crap about your massive series bible if you can't manage the basics of telling an interesting story with compelling characters -- but once you're staring down the barrel of (oh my god) 181 books, world design matters.
Hmmmm I don’t think that is accurate. There was the Legend of Huma, the history of the elven nations, the creation story of the gnomes, King Priest of Ishtar and The cataclysm. That is just to name a few.
 


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