D&D (2024) Things You Think Would Improve the Game That We WON'T See

payn

He'll flip ya...Flip ya for real...
I don't mind prime-stat ability scores slowly increasing as you level up, as a side effect of lots of practice and training at doing what you do, but this advancement IMO shouldn't be nearly as predictable as the WotC editions have it.

1e's Unearthed Arcana introduced the Cavalier class. Unremarkable in itself, it brought with it a wonderful mechanic for unpredictable but reasonably consistent ability score advancement by level called "percentile increments". This system can easily be tacked on to all classes in any edition.

How it works, in short:

--- At 1st level your prime stat gets a d% roll attached; thus a Mage with starting Int of 15 who rolls 87% has that Int become 15.87.
--- Each time that class levels up, some dice* are rolled and added to the percent number. If, say, the dice roll is 9 then that 15.87 becomes 15.96. If the dice roll, however, is 16 then that 15.87 becomes 15.103, which becomes 16.03: the stat advances.
--- Repeat each level. Next level that 16.03 might add 12 and become 16.15. That's it. Simple as pie.

The huge benefit of this in my eyes is the unpredictability of it - one character might advance a stat right away while another might wait several levels or more to advance a stat; but the law of averages pretty much dictates everyone will advance a point over a certain amount of levels. You can (and we have) expand this to a player-chosen secondary stat as well, which advances more slowly by rolling a smaller set of increment dice per level.

* - the incremental dice can vary from campaign to campaign depending how often the DM wants the characters, on average, to advance their prime stats. I used to use 2d10 per level but found it a bit too slow, now I use 3d8 per level which seems to work OK. To match WotC's advance speeds (a point per four levels), it would probably have to be more like 6d6 per level, or 4d6+8, or something similar.

For secondary stats I use 2d6 per level and they tend not to advance very often. :)
You lost me at 15.87...
 

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CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing
I don't remember which TTRPG it was, but a while ago I played a game where all save throws were handled with a single ability score (Luck), completely separate from Dex, Con, etc. I still think it's a surprisingly elegant and efficient way to handle them.
 

Weapon-as-class. Rage and Spells are already weapons tbh, so might as well embrace it fully for max combination. Let me be a Rage-and-Wildshape-using adventurer.
 





payn

He'll flip ya...Flip ya for real...
Is it really that difficult to put .xy after a stat and update that only when you level?
Oh man, I'm having flash backs to the fractional BAB of 3E. So, at level up you roll % and get say 33 and now are you at 16.2? What is the value in this? Also, this rando rolling makes the game difficult to balance out which is why these random elements have been left out of chargen/monstergen for the better.
 

Minigiant

Legend
Supporter
I don't mind prime-stat ability scores slowly increasing as you level up, as a side effect of lots of practice and training at doing what you do, but this advancement IMO shouldn't be nearly as predictable as the WotC editions have it.

1e's Unearthed Arcana introduced the Cavalier class. Unremarkable in itself, it brought with it a wonderful mechanic for unpredictable but reasonably consistent ability score advancement by level called "percentile increments". This system can easily be tacked on to all classes in any edition.

How it works, in short:

--- At 1st level your prime stat gets a d% roll attached; thus a Mage with starting Int of 15 who rolls 87% has that Int become 15.87.
--- Each time that class levels up, some dice* are rolled and added to the percent number. If, say, the dice roll is 9 then that 15.87 becomes 15.96. If the dice roll, however, is 16 then that 15.87 becomes 15.103, which becomes 16.03: the stat advances.
--- Repeat each level. Next level that 16.03 might add 12 and become 16.15. That's it. Simple as pie.

The huge benefit of this in my eyes is the unpredictability of it - one character might advance a stat right away while another might wait several levels or more to advance a stat; but the law of averages pretty much dictates everyone will advance a point over a certain amount of levels. You can (and we have) expand this to a player-chosen secondary stat as well, which advances more slowly by rolling a smaller set of increment dice per level.

* - the incremental dice can vary from campaign to campaign depending how often the DM wants the characters, on average, to advance their prime stats. I used to use 2d10 per level but found it a bit too slow, now I use 3d8 per level which seems to work OK. To match WotC's advance speeds (a point per four levels), it would probably have to be more like 6d6 per level, or 4d6+8, or something similar.

For secondary stats I use 2d6 per level and they tend not to advance very often. :)
I tried twice to get a group to accept this to no avail.
 

Lanefan

Victoria Rules
Oh man, I'm having flash backs to the fractional BAB of 3E.
Fractional BAB? Never hit this in my 3e days.
So, at level up you roll % and get say 33 and now are you at 16.2? What is the value in this?
Edit: no, you only roll d% once, during char-gen, to represent your starting point at 1st level. After that, at each level after 1st you roll a set of dice that might vary depending on the campaign (I use 3d8) to add to that roll.

If you rolled 33 (let's say your campaign's incremental dice are 6d6 and you got lucky) to get you to 16.20 that means you started from 15.87, and the value is that your 15 just became a 16.

Next level you might roll 25, taking your 16.20 to 16.45. This changes nothing anywhere other than putting you a bit closer to eventually jumping that 16 up to 17 a few levels hence.

In every way other than at level up, you ignore the % bit and just treat the stat as the whole integer before the decimal point. This is not repeat NOT like 1e percentile strength for Fighters, where bonuses etc. changed based on your d% roll.
Also, this rando rolling makes the game difficult to balance out which is why these random elements have been left out of chargen/monstergen for the better.
If someone having a 16 in a stat where someone else only has a 15 is enough to throw the balance out of whack, something's gone fundamentally wrong somewhere.

Besides, if the game didn't expect randomness it wouldn't use dice.
 

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