What are you reading in 2023?

Ryujin

Legend
I was surprised to learn of a 5th and 6th, depending on whether you call the Tales of Earthsea book of short stories a "volume" or not

(The Other Wind being the "6th")
I really need to start reading it.
(From "The Books of Earthsea - The Complete Illustrated Edition" hardcover)

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Saracenus

Always In School Gamer
How readable is the hardcover? I find sometimes hardcovers are too large to hold in my hands to comfortably read in my easy chair or in bed
The Books of Earthsea - The Complete Illustrated Edition is one I am definitely not lugging around (it has some heft) and my eyes need more light to read, so I usually sit up in a comfy chair when I am reading it. In bed, it is less easy to read unless you have the pillows to sit up. This might be a function of my needing progressive lenses to read "regular text."
 

overgeeked

B/X Known World
One of the things I like to do is read writing books and mine them for referee advice. While watching a bit of a Matt Colville Twitch stream the other day, I was reminded of a screenwriting book I have on my shelf. So I picked it up and read it. Secrets Of Action Screenwriting by William C. Martell. It's pretty good as far as genre-specific writing books go. It breaks the genre down quite well and provides a lot of useful tools to use. This kind of thing might "spoil the magic" for people as it's a glimpse at how the sausage is made, but for referee advice (and genre-specific writing advice), it's pretty good to fantastic.
 


I finished reading Weis and Hickman's Forging the Darksword. I liked it more than I expected. It felt somewhat Sanderson-like, before Sanderson was a thing.

The more I return to the original Dragonlance trilogy, the more I suspect that the large cast of characters worked against it. Here, there's a fraction of the number of characters and you get a much tighter story. I do think that you could've shaved 50 pages or so off of it to tighten it even further.

Now I'm reading The Tolkien Reader.
 


Zaukrie

New Publisher
One of the things I like to do is read writing books and mine them for referee advice. While watching a bit of a Matt Colville Twitch stream the other day, I was reminded of a screenwriting book I have on my shelf. So I picked it up and read it. Secrets Of Action Screenwriting by William C. Martell. It's pretty good as far as genre-specific writing books go. It breaks the genre down quite well and provides a lot of useful tools to use. This kind of thing might "spoil the magic" for people as it's a glimpse at how the sausage is made, but for referee advice (and genre-specific writing advice), it's pretty good to fantastic.
Check out this site
 

Alzrius

The EN World kitten
Having finished Lewis Carroll in Numberland, I can say that it turned out to be far more focused on his mathematical work than on his overall life. While it's still a biography in that it follows his life chronologically, and gives minimal observance to other major events of his childhood and professional career, these are presented largely to provide the context in which he worked on his math puzzles. And those puzzles are replete throughout the book, which wouldn't be an issue if they weren't such expansive, complex problems! o_O

I enjoy recreational math – among my friends, I refer to D&D as "a game of combat algebra" – but Lewis Carroll in Numberland makes it very clear that Dodgson was operating several levels above what I'm capable of reaching, or at least not without some serious remedial studying! As such, I don't recommend the book to anyone who isn't either a hardcore fan of his work (there's only a little Alice-related material in the book) or a serious mathematicaphile.

In the meantime, on to The Descent of Ishtar.
So I just finished my copy of The Descent of Ishtar, with it having taken longer than I expected to complete my reading. This was largely due to the copy I ordered not only having both the Sumerian (i.e. where the goddess is Inanna) and Akkadian (i.e. where the goddess is Ishtar) versions of the tale, but also having the incomplete stories of The Epic of Anzû and Erra and Ishum (aka The Epic of Erra), the latter, according to its Wikipedia page, apparently having been more important to the people of that era than the better-known-today Epic of Gilgamesh!

With that said, I'm moving on to Ian Livingstone's and Steve Jackson's Dice Men, which tells the origin story of Games Workshop, though in truth I've been reading it for a little while now, and am already nearly finished.
 
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