D&D Movie/TV Check Out The D&D Movie's Cast -- In Costume!

At San Diego Comic Con, next year's D&D movie, Honor Among Thieves, is getting a preview. Additionally, there's a 'tavern experience' where visitors can interact with D&D monsters and drink 'dragon brew', and at which is also displayed images of the cast of the movie in costume! everything below comes from that tavern experience, but there is an official panel/event later today (Thursday).


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Photo: ComicBook.com​

Various media outlets are there and are posting previews and photos:

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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey


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Vaalingrade

Legend
Oh man, I wish we could get a bard like Thom Merillin from WoT, though instead we are getting a slightly older Starlord.
That's a D&D bard.

Thom would be so far removed from the bard we expect that there would be a riot. And I would be in front playing 10000 Fists in the Air on a boombox.

Yes, I still have a boombox.
 

Mercador

Adventurer
Lol. technically the first D&D movie came first, but they were still released pretty close together.
Yeah, I was joking. Stuff around D&D aren't good generally or should I say, when D&D managers are trying to do things. Dark Alliance was an horror even before WotC decided to purchase the studio and they still did purchase the studio. I remember the old D&D movie, it wasn't good either. Not that everything is bad though, the original 2 Dark Alliances were excellent games, like Baldur's Gate and Icewind Dale. But it wasn't TSR or WotC, it was Interplay and Bioware. The brand is too big to fail anymore but everything around it is not always really good.
 

Reynard

Legend
Yeah, I was joking. Stuff around D&D aren't good generally or should I say, when D&D managers are trying to do things. Dark Alliance was an horror even before WotC decided to purchase the studio and they still did purchase the studio. I remember the old D&D movie, it wasn't good either. Not that everything is bad though, the original 2 Dark Alliances were excellent games, like Baldur's Gate and Icewind Dale. But it wasn't TSR or WotC, it was Interplay and Bioware. The brand is too big to fail anymore but everything around it is not always really good.
I love the original dark alliance games. Such good Gauntlet vibes.
 




That's a D&D bard.

Thom would be so far removed from the bard we expect that there would be a riot. And I would be in front playing 10000 Fists in the Air on a boombox.

Yes, I still have a boombox.
Not even the WoT series did Thom Merrilin like in the books. Which, to be honest, was probably a good choice, as a guy in his 70s doing acrobatic flips and seducing the young ladies probably would have been all sorts of issues...
 


doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
The original with the Rat Pack or the remake?
Does it change the point, either way?
That's a D&D bard.

Thom would be so far removed from the bard we expect that there would be a riot. And I would be in front playing 10000 Fists in the Air on a boombox.

Yes, I still have a boombox.
Man I see Thom’s all the time, but pretty much never a foppish lutier that seduces everything. Like…even back in high school, my half-elf bard was a sword fighter with dreams of knighthood who would wax philosophical about the importance of stories and music to the pursuit of both happiness and meaning in life.
 

jgsugden

Legend
Why would they?

CR has no ownership of hot ginger Druids. I would go so far as to say that one of the classic female Druid-type character looks is hot ginger with some startling or striking feature or other.

This is like wondering if they talked to the makers of Ocean’s 11 about Chris Pine’s character. 🤷‍♂️
2 Reasons why they would:

1.) When a lot of people look at a character say, "That is pretty much exactly XXXX", then there is room for someone to make a Copyright Claim. The basic rule is: The more detailed the character, the more you can protect. So, if you have an attractive female red headed Druid (4 characteristics) and try to protect it, you're unlikely to have a case. But if you add something more specific like horns which extend backwards and are of the same style on an otherwise human face? Or if they ask a lot of questions and seem confused a lot like Keyleth did in Campaign 1?

Keyleth as a member of campaign 1 has 373 hours of D&D recorded and published, comic books, an animated series, source books, etc.., that describe her. She is a very detailed character compared to many that appear in just one movie or bone book - and there have been many successful Copyright protection fights over characters that appear in just one movie.

So, if Critical Role, or Amazon (who has a lot to say about the animated CR series), thought the movie character infringed on the IP too much, it is entirely possible for someone to bring an IP suit seeking damages or a restraining order. Those could have huge impacts. Even if you thought the odds were low of CR/Amazon winning, there is a risk, and if a simple conversation, agreement, and light compensation are all it takes to make clear boundaries that both sides agree are permissible, a lot of investors would be pushing to see that done to protect their investment.

2.) Legal battles are one thing, but public 'media' battles are another. Imagine Marisha made one jestful Tweet like, "Gee, I wonder where they got the idea for their druid? I mean, I would have done it if you'd asked me. You didn't have to find a clone."

What would have been done with that statement?

There are a huge number of people out there trying to fabricate drama on Social Media to drive views and subscribers. What would they do with the situation? 'Mainstream' media does the same thing to get clicks.

This movie is targeting a certain audience - and a significant portion of that audience is, or knows, fans of CR. If the CR fanbase came to the conclusion, collectively, that CR was not happy about the situation, it could have impacts on the marketing and support for the film. CR has a very wide and often 'very supportive' fanbase that is quite loyal.

So - why would they? Low cost to do it, lots of ways for things to go wrong if they don't, and lots of ways to benefit by doing it.
 


doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
2 Reasons why they would:

1.) When a lot of people look at a character say, "That is pretty much exactly XXXX", then there is room for someone to make a Copyright Claim. The basic rule is: The more detailed the character, the more you can protect. So, if you have an attractive female red headed Druid (4 characteristics) and try to protect it, you're unlikely to have a case. But if you add something more specific like horns which extend backwards and are of the same style on an otherwise human face? Or if they ask a lot of questions and seem confused a lot like Keyleth did in Campaign 1?

Keyleth as a member of campaign 1 has 373 hours of D&D recorded and published, comic books, an animated series, source books, etc.., that describe her. She is a very detailed character compared to many that appear in just one movie or bone book - and there have been many successful Copyright protection fights over characters that appear in just one movie.

So, if Critical Role, or Amazon (who has a lot to say about the animated CR series), thought the movie character infringed on the IP too much, it is entirely possible for someone to bring an IP suit seeking damages or a restraining order. Those could have huge impacts. Even if you thought the odds were low of CR/Amazon winning, there is a risk, and if a simple conversation, agreement, and light compensation are all it takes to make clear boundaries that both sides agree are permissible, a lot of investors would be pushing to see that done to protect their investment.

2.) Legal battles are one thing, but public 'media' battles are another. Imagine Marisha made one jestful Tweet like, "Gee, I wonder where they got the idea for their druid? I mean, I would have done it if you'd asked me. You didn't have to find a clone."

What would have been done with that statement?

There are a huge number of people out there trying to fabricate drama on Social Media to drive views and subscribers. What would they do with the situation? 'Mainstream' media does the same thing to get clicks.

This movie is targeting a certain audience - and a significant portion of that audience is, or knows, fans of CR. If the CR fanbase came to the conclusion, collectively, that CR was not happy about the situation, it could have impacts on the marketing and support for the film. CR has a very wide and often 'very supportive' fanbase that is quite loyal.

So - why would they? Low cost to do it, lots of ways for things to go wrong if they don't, and lots of ways to benefit by doing it.
Except none of that is remotely necessary.

The characters aren’t anywhere in the ballpark of copyright infringement, Keyleth didn’t even have horns, she had a headdress with antlers, and the similarity is so generic it’s completely absurd to claim that the two are “basically the same”.

Especially since “hot ginger Druid” and “Druid with antlers or horns” are both very common. Every Druid I’ve played with in the last 20 years has had some sort of head accoutrement, and probably a quarter have looked like stereotypical celts of some order, mostly hot gingers.

I’ve been seeing characters that fit that description on online character art since before 5e dropped.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
Here is Keyleth, in her official art.

No horns. (Again, antlers, on a headdress) No tail, either. Different colored eyes. Very different hair style.

CR doesn’t own hot ginger Druids. They didn’t invent the archetype, and would utterly fail without question if they tried to “protect” any claim to IP ownership over the concept.

This is much more absurd than the lady that tried to bully CR over the character Opal, as if an earth Genasi named opal, with opal tones, and opal jewelry, was something she could own.
 

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jgsugden

Legend
Except none of that is remotely necessary.

The characters aren’t anywhere in the ballpark of copyright infringement, Keyleth didn’t even have horns, she had a headdress with antlers, and the similarity is so generic it’s completely absurd to claim that the two are “basically the same”.

Especially since “hot ginger Druid” and “Druid with antlers or horns” are both very common. Every Druid I’ve played with in the last 20 years has had some sort of head accoutrement, and probably a quarter have looked like stereotypical celts of some order, mostly hot gingers.

I’ve been seeing characters that fit that description on online character art since before 5e dropped.
Your unusual experience aside (I've played for 40 years and seen hundreds of druids aand can't think of a single one with any type of bones/antlers/etc... in a game in which I played - I'm not sure why you think it normally for the idea to spontaneously originated in many places as it would have for it to occur so widely as you say without something specific to point to as an inspiration), the question is not what you believe. It is whether it can be argued, as risk adverse investors want risk limited and if an argument can be made, as it has by myself and others, here and elsewhere, it is something to be considered.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
Your unusual experience aside (I've played for 40 years and seen hundreds of druids aand can't think of a single one with any type of bones/antlers/etc... in a game in which I played - I'm not sure why you think it normally for the idea to spontaneously originated in many places as it would have for it to occur so widely as you say without something specific to point to as an inspiration), the question is not what you believe. It is whether it can be argued, as risk adverse investors want risk limited and if an argument can be made, as it has by myself and others, here and elsewhere, it is something to be considered.
Only if it can seriously be argued and has some marginal chances of being taken seriously in court.

The idea would be absurd on its face even if we ignore the commonality of hot ginger Druids (Druid here just means nature based magic user, after all) and Druids with headdresses.

You may have noticed that the one part of my post you decided to reply to as if it were the whole thing, was in fact one small part of the post.
 

jgsugden

Legend
Only if it can seriously be argued and has some marginal chances of being taken seriously in court.

The idea would be absurd on its face even if we ignore the commonality of hot ginger Druids (Druid here just means nature based magic user, after all) and Druids with headdresses.
Which is why it has been a topic in many places? That this 'new' character looks and so far acts more than a bit like Keyleth?

I get that you do not see it. I don't get that you can't understand how others do.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
Which is why it has been a topic in many places? That this 'new' character looks and so far acts more than a bit like Keyleth?

I get that you do not see it. I don't get that you can't understand how others do.
It’s not that I don’t see any similarity. It’s just hilariously absurd to think the film makers needed to “check with CR” about the character. “Oh hey, our Druid is a hot ginger tiefling.” “Okay?” “Idk someone thought I should check with you for some reason.” “Did they tell you to check with us about having a male, womanizing, bard that’s older than the rest of the group, and is generally a shady guy?”

Like what?

Come on. It’s a topic in several places because people overthink things and look for things to point at and speculatively armchair lawyer at. 🤷‍♂️


Also she acts nothing like Keyleth. We have seen no awkwardness, lack of confidence, nervous rambling, or like…anything I’d associate with Keyleth that remotely stands out? And Keyleth isn’t a deadpan serious person who asks incisive and disarming questions.

The similarity is literally:

Ginger (not even an uncommon trait in female fantasy characters)
Hot (extremely common female character trait)
Druid (one of 13 options in the game)
Not an especially adept socializer. (Extremely common Druid character trait)
Uses wildshape in combat. (…I hope this is self explanatory)
 

Which is why it has been a topic in many places? That this 'new' character looks and so far acts more than a bit like Keyleth?

I get that you do not see it. I don't get that you can't understand how others do.
Keyleth looks like a stereotypical D&D druid. You might as well accuse Xenk of copywrite violations because he wears armour and carries a sword!
OIP.iw6Y_igIk71r3TcEGtYGKQHaLo
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Jaheria, Baldur's Gate 2 and Elanee, NWN2.

As for "acts", all we learn of Doric in the trailer is she is taking the rip out of the party leader. That requires far more self-confidence than Keyleth has. And turns into an owlbear. Which Keyleth never does. Turning into animals generally is on a par with a fighter hitting things with a sword. That's what D&D druids do.
 
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