Critical Role Do you Critical Role?

Do you Critical Role?

  • Um...what's 'Critical Role'? Is it some kind of podcast or something?

    Votes: 3 1.3%
  • I've never watched a single episode.

    Votes: 51 22.9%
  • Not really. It's just not my cup of tea.

    Votes: 62 27.8%
  • Eh, I'll watch it every now and then, when I'm bored or whatever.

    Votes: 22 9.9%
  • Every now and then, when I can find the time.

    Votes: 29 13.0%
  • I'm a regular viewer. Is it Thursday yet?

    Votes: 35 15.7%
  • Yep. And Talks Machina, and Between the Sheets, and Handbooker Helper, and...

    Votes: 21 9.4%

  • Poll closed .

robus

Lowcountry Low Roller
Supporter
Actors at least know how and why to go after what they want in a scene and always have an objective to strive for. Which in turns actually pushes the story forward and makes the drama compelling. Most of these other streams have just regular people listen to a DM narrate what's going on for 2 minutes and then respond with stuff like "I open the door." Not exactly the most interesting thing to listen to in the world.

I think this is key and probably why the game feels so "unrealistic" to many D&D regulars. Certainly in my game my players rarely talk to each other in character about their characters, there's literally no curiosity about the characters themselves, it's just onward with the adventure. Now some of that is because two of the players have pre-gen characters from the starter set (so little investment in the chars themselves), but still their lack of interest in developing their characters has been an interesting contrast to what happens on Critical Role. Basically I feel like I have to do most of the "creating" in the game (which is normal I know) but thanks to the creative contribution from the Critical Role players Matt gets a lot of hooks for him to develop so it ends up being a very virtuous cycle. He gives them hooks for immediate adventures and they in turn give him hooks for future developments. It's very cool to see.
 

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SkidAce

Legend
Supporter
I was enjoying youtube/podcast Live Play before it was cool. "Shakes cane at yard"

But seriously, even though I listened and enjoyed many podcasts, I never had the time to WATCH them. I listened while I ran 4 or 5 miles, or while I cut the grass, or while I drove long distances.

So it was never matter of "I cant find the time" or "I would rather be actually playing", because I couldn't play at those times anyway. I do listen to less rock music than before, but now that plays in the background at home.

That out of the way, in MOST cases, its fun to hear other people play, and see them either come up with fresh viewpoints, or to chuckle at the same tropes and humorous styled incidents I have seen in my groups since the 80s.

Icosohedrophillia: https://podfanatic.com/podcast/icosahedrophilia (ended in 2014, seven year run?)

Pretend Wizards (ball bearings!)

D&D Penny Arcade (2008/9)

Robot Chicken (2010)

And there was one I cant find (I usually save them to disk) that had a creepy sanitoriuim/prison and a ghost with a harp...Fantastic atmosphere, very well done. I will edit if I remember.

Edit: Beer and Battle, Pathfinder episodes, well done, very creepy.
 
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Henry

Autoexreginated
I think this is key and probably why the game feels so "unrealistic" to many D&D regulars. Certainly in my game my players rarely talk to each other in character about their characters, there's literally no curiosity about the characters themselves, it's just onward with the adventure.

I’m fortunate in that the groups I’ve hooked up with over the years have made in-character discussion and debate part of the table dynamic; a few years ago we had an absolute blast with the Paizo Hell’s Rebels AP, even to the point of having fairly involved discussions in-character about beliefs, political theory, and religious freedom! We had plenty of butt-kicking too, but the in-character conflicts really brought the whole scenario to life in a way that “just playing freedom fighters” would not have.

I guess for this reason I’m glad to see so much RP in Critical Role to be representative of they different ways to play. However, at the same time, it’s hard to get people to understand sometimes that they’re not going to be “CR”-caliber role players the minute they sit at the table; Matt seems to frequently have to remind people of this.
 

Azzy

KMF DM
There's a part of me that wants to watch it because I've heard great things about it., but there's a larger part that is fairly disinterested in it. The fact that each episode is, apparently, several hours long is also a difficult pill to swallow.
 

Phazonfish

B-Rank Agent
I love the show and catch it live every week. It probably helps that I was a big fan of Travis, Laura, Liam, and Ashley before starting the show; my friends who play are also spread pretty far apart and can rarely meet for a game, so this is also basically my only way of enjoying D&D nowadays.

In other news, I really like this thread. It restores my faith in humanity to see so many people able to express a distaste or indifference so respectfully.
 

TheBaronCB

Villager
I’ve returned to D&D after a 25-year hiatus. The amount of digital support is amazing, whether it be Roll20, Fantasy Grounds or DNDBeyond. Critical Role is another part of that and I’m enjoying watching it very much.
 

briggart

Explorer
I used to watch it regularly until the end of the Briarwoods arc, then gradually lost interest and stopped completely watching it towards the end of the chroma conclave. So option 3 would probably be my answer now, but a couple of years ago I would have said 6.
 

I watched some episodes from the first season, but the episodes are very long, and it quickly felt like they were trying too hard. It felt a bit too staged. I think I'd rather watch real players play a D&D session and seeing genuine emotions.

However, I appreciate how the show has opened up the game to more people.
 

robus

Lowcountry Low Roller
Supporter
I watched some episodes from the first season, but the episodes are very long, and it quickly felt like they were trying too hard. It felt a bit too staged. I think I'd rather watch real players play a D&D session and seeing genuine emotions.

However, I appreciate how the show has opened up the game to more people.

“real players”?! that sounds a bit gatekeepery for you? What’s not real about how they play? And i’ve plenty of genuine emotion in the game. You surprise me!
 



CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing
i think it’s more the sense that people that like Critical Role are not appreciating the real D&D experience.
If this pleasant and peaceful thread decomposes into a putrid "debate" about what is and is not a "real D&D experience" I swear I will Hex you all. :)
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
i think it’s more the sense that people that like Critical Role are not appreciating the real D&D experience.

I’ve played a lot of D&D games with a lot of different groups. They were all different. I have no idea what the real D&D experience is supposed to be.
 

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