TSR TSR3.5 Voluntarily Dismisses Lawsuit

A lawsuit filed by TSR3 against D&D owners Wizards of the Coast a few days ago was voluntarily dismissed.

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Dismissal without prejudice means that the suit can be filed again. The suit lasted two days from the 7th to the 9th of December. The IndieGoGo fundraiser to fund it is still running.



At first glance, the below document is dated 21st October so it’s reasonable to assume that it is not related to the recent filing; however, apparently that date is incorrect. The correct date is in the footer, and this is indeed the dismissal of the recent filing and can be found on PACER (Public Access to Court Electronic Records).

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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey


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Stormonu

Legend
Imagine how much work NuTSR will have to put in to roll everything back once they pry control back out of WOTCs soulless corporate woke grasp
I get the impression NuTSR is adverse to work - unless it's to get worked up. If it fell in their lap, I can't imagine they'd do anything more than ride the money wave of what already exists whilst claiming they're going to change everything (then actually touch nothing and "forget" to order another print run).
 


Rabulias

the Incomparably Shrewd and Clever
I don't know that I'd consider the thought sobering... unless it's a realization about how much time has passed and how much closer I am to the grave by comparison.
Look at it the other way - I consider that time as further proof supporting the hypothesis that I will live forever! :cool:
 

Wilphe

Adventurer
I get the impression NuTSR is adverse to work - unless it's to get worked up. If it fell in their lap, I can't imagine they'd do anything more than ride the money wave of what already exists whilst claiming they're going to change everything (then actually touch nothing and "forget" to order another print run).
That was kind of my point


NuTSR getting D&D back

and

NuTSR doing any work


Both extremely unlikely
 





Shakeshift

Adventurer
The funny part is that WotC can't really lose against Lanasa no matter what. They can just throw lawyers after lawyers at the problem, and tie the whole thing up in court until Lanasa goes completely broke from legal fees. They can just strand him on an island and let him slowly starve.

Disney does this with independent contractors all the time. They lean in for a heavy 7-year drawn-out lawsuit, and their enemies go broke after year two because nobody has $400,000 for lawyer's fees and court costs and legal expenditures. It's nothing to Disney, but the average person goes broke in no time at all.

And yes, as someone else pointed out, Lanasa cannot get "back" the TSR copyright because he never owned it, had anything to do with it, never created anything for it, or was paid for TSR ownership when it was sold in 1997, and later acquired by Hasbro in 1999. At that point, everyone on this forum board has as much "ownership" of TSR as Justin Lanasa has. I actually have more, because I can easily describe the entire game in detail, which puts me light years ahead of Lanasa.

Lanasa can't get the original TSR because he's never owned it in his life. He can trot out Ernie Gygax all he wants, but Ernie also has no claim since his father sold his shares in 1985. Ernie has no factual claim, legal or otherwise. He's as clueless about all of this as Justin.
 


adamantyr

Adventurer
The funny part is that WotC can't really lose against Lanasa no matter what. They can just throw lawyers after lawyers at the problem, and tie the whole thing up in court until Lanasa goes completely broke from legal fees. They can just strand him on an island and let him slowly starve.

Disney does this with independent contractors all the time. They lean in for a heavy 7-year drawn-out lawsuit, and their enemies go broke after year two because nobody has $400,000 for lawyer's fees and court costs and legal expenditures. It's nothing to Disney, but the average person goes broke in no time at all.

And yes, as someone else pointed out, Lanasa cannot get "back" the TSR copyright because he never owned it, had anything to do with it, never created anything for it, or was paid for TSR ownership when it was sold in 1997, and later acquired by Hasbro in 1999. At that point, everyone on this forum board has as much "ownership" of TSR as Justin Lanasa has. I actually have more, because I can easily describe the entire game in detail, which puts me light years ahead of Lanasa.

Lanasa can't get the original TSR because he's never owned it in his life. He can trot out Ernie Gygax all he wants, but Ernie also has no claim since his father sold his shares in 1985. Ernie has no factual claim, legal or otherwise. He's as clueless about all of this as Justin.
That's true, but the main point is they can't lose because LaNasa's case is completely without any merit at all.
 

adamantyr

Adventurer
Also, does anyone know a way to view the court documents for this? The one link offered is a pay site and I'm disinclined to pay $50 a month just to keep up with things.


I've tried searching the WA courts public case site as well as King county's, but it doesn't turn up anything for the lawsuit, even given the case number.
 

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
Also, does anyone know a way to view the court documents for this? The one link offered is a pay site and I'm disinclined to pay $50 a month just to keep up with things.


I've tried searching the WA courts public case site as well as King county's, but it doesn't turn up anything for the lawsuit, even given the case number.

Two court systems- the federal and the state.

This is a federal case, which means that the filings are on PACER. For various stupid historical reasons, federal filings require you to pay money to access.

Many states allow you to view court filings for free.
 


Ulfgeir

Hero
Two court systems- the federal and the state.

This is a federal case, which means that the filings are on PACER. For various stupid historical reasons, federal filings require you to pay money to access.

Many states allow you to view court filings for free.

Techdirt.com has written lots about PACER. The US goverment are appearently kind of thinking about removing the fees.
Senate Inches Closer To Providing Free Access To PACER

So in a millenia or two, you might have it for free ;)
 

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