TSR TSR3 Throws In Towel, Rebrands Wonderfilled

In the news story that never ends, after reversing its position earlier and admitting that it was NOT the original TSR reincarnated, the new TSR company, embroiled in acrimony for the last two weeks, and having blamed the widespread criticism it has received on Wizards of the Coast, has deleted its own Twitter account and rebranded its website, misspelling it’s own name in the process.

In just a week a much-loved trademark, which was associated with the creation of our entire hobby, and which generally attracted nostalgic affection as recently as a fortnight ago, has been utterly trashed in an astonishing display of self-destructive publicity and incompetence. Two companies (one of which was directly responsible for the damage) have now divested themselves of it, and most major conventions have banned the company behind it, due to the actions and statements of three people: Justin LaNasa, Stephen Dinehart, and Ernie Gygax. "TSR" is no longer a brand which anybody wants to be associated with — not even the company which ‘relaunched’ it two weeks ago, let alone the company they sniped it from. It has been a spectacular masterclass in how not to manage a brand.

Screen Shot 2021-07-07 at 8.31.55 PM.png


This followed an astonishing day of activity where one of the three TSR3 founders, Stephen Dinehart announced - publicly! - that he had blocked WotC and Hasbro on Twitter. After everybody thought things couldn't get any more ridiculous, they did.

02788BD5-D754-4949-8CF4-2975310BDB8D.jpeg

As TSR2 rebranded to Solarian this week (after TSR3 sniped their name and trademark due to a missed filing), we've now gone from two TSRs to zero TSRs in the space of a few days.

Screen Shot 2021-07-07 at 8.36.19 PM.png



Most people assume that WotC (or Hasbro) has been in contact with TSR3 regarding its use of copyrighted imagery.

Meanwhile, search teams have been sent out for Michael, the mysterious PR officer announced last week who made two posts and then was never heard from again. In the meantime, somebody has set up a parody Twitter account for him.
 

log in or register to remove this ad

Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey


log in or register to remove this ad



OakenHart

Adventurer
The man has earned the right to retire and focus on his art as art rather than art as income. I doubt the TSR3: Die Harder and the Dragonlance foofaraw had any real influence other than to reinforce the idea of working for yourself, you control your own narrative.
Absolutely earned the right to retire, but it's still a bit sad when you see so great a talent no longer share their work (which of course is completely their prerogative and we are not entitled to any of their work). Larry Elmore's work IS the look of classic D&D to me, and he will forever remain one of my favorite artists.
 

Stephen Shomo

Explorer
Absolutely earned the right to retire, but it's still a bit sad when you see so great a talent no longer share their work (which of course is completely their prerogative and we are not entitled to any of their work). Larry Elmore's work IS the look of classic D&D to me, and he will forever remain one of my favorite artists.
Not to be morbid and cynical.... but....... I am sure his estate will sell his unpublished works.
 

GreyLord

Legend
Yes and no. Hasbro purchased WotC in 1999 and the OGL was published in 2000 after the launch of 3e D&D in 2000. I believe 3e and Dancy's work on the OGL pre-dates the purchase of WotC but the Hasbro was in the mix when it was finally released.

I also want to add, the resistance to the OGL was internal to WotC (Hasbro could have vetoed it before it ever left the gate). I know from conversations I had with people I knew at WotC (I was in Seattle at the time working for a tech startup) that those in the anti-OGL faction at WotC gained strength when the D20 glut/quality issues started and came to a head when The Book of Erotic Fantasy was published. By Ryan knew what he was doing and the OGL continues to make possible Pathfinder, various OSR D&D clones, and a host of other genre clones to provide options to those that do not want to play the current iteration or create content for it.
From my perspective...

At the time, Hasbro was more interested in the Pokemon and MtG licenses. D&D was a side line which was incidental to the purchase. Sure, it was useful to have, but it wasn't the reason WotC was pursued originally by Hasbro.

The Pokemon slant is actually rather ironic.
 


Dausuul

Legend
Absolutely earned the right to retire, but it's still a bit sad when you see so great a talent no longer share their work (which of course is completely their prerogative and we are not entitled to any of their work). Larry Elmore's work IS the look of classic D&D to me, and he will forever remain one of my favorite artists.
Well, he didn't say he wasn't going to share his work. He just said he wasn't taking commissions, i.e., he's going to paint what he wants to paint instead of what someone else is paying him to paint.

(He also didn't say he was going to share his work, of course. As you say, it's his prerogative either way. But I hope he does put some of it out there!)
 








Libertad

Adventurer
Also, the new company name that is the subject of this thread makes me think of Wonderbread, or some kind of pastry cream concoction.
 




the Jester

Legend
If that were the issue, the data should show lots of groups that play homebrew adventures hitting level 20 on the reg. As far as I know, they do not. Mine certainly doesn't.
The higher levels are, at least in 5e, basically completely unsupported. They have been largely unsupported for several editions. If there was material to play and for DMs to learn how to design good high level adventures from, I suspect we'd see more higher level play.

Speaking as a guy whose campaign includes lots of high level stuff and is going epic level as we speak, I'd love to see some high level support published, assuming it was quality.
 

Visit Our Sponsor

Latest threads

Level Up!

An Advertisement

Advertisement4

Top