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What are your Pedantic Complaints about D&D?

jasper

Explorer
Elfs trance equal 8 hours of sleep. Get rid of trance.
Dex not affecting heavy armour.
Having to do accounting for some material components
People who create these threads
People who response to these threads.
 

77IM

The Grand Druid (level 22)
Rats should have a climb speed. A rat and a squirrel are basically the same creature (except the squirrel has fashion sense), and we've all seen a squirrel scamper up a tree. Rats are just as adept at scampering, and are certainly more adept than cats, which do have a climb speed. I think this omission must have just been an oversight by someone unfamiliar with rats.

Do you remember the thread about the keelboat and how it made no sense and the designers were probably confusing the riverboat definition with the small sailboat definition? Ugh. The "sailing ship" is a similar problem, as that stat block is apparently meant to cover a vast array of vessels, some of which have substantial differences (substantial = actually matter in game play). It would be like having a single weapon called "sword" and expecting it to cover everything from a dagger up through a zweihänder. This seems like something that a couple of hours on wikipedia could have solved, easily.

Light sources have variable drop-off rates regarding dim light, which isn't how light works. For example, a candle sheds bright light for 5 feet and dim light for an additional 5 feet, while a daylight spell spreads bright light for 60 feet and dim light for an additional 60 feet. But the spread of light follows a simple inverse-square law, so the area of dim light shouldn't "stretch" just because the bright light is brighter. Once the light has dimmed enough to be considered "dim," there should be a consistent span of dim light.
 

jgsugden

Explorer
...4. How does Darkvision even work? If there's no light, how do they see at all? This is why I house-rule that all creatures with Darkvision have infravision and infrared bioluminescence...
My house rule for this - Creatures with darkvision emit a special kind of light that only they can see. It comes from their eyes and is absorbed back by the eyes. A creature with darkvision can't see the darkvision 'light' of another creature, but there are (homebrew) spells that allow a spellcaster to see the 'cones' of light emited by a creature with darkvision.

As for my pedantics - none. Because - magic.
 

Charlaquin

Explorer
3. Studded Leather Armor. What do the studs even do?
They secure small overlapping metal plates to the inside of the leather (or more often heavy cloth) garment. “Studded Leather” is just one among many examples of Victorian scholars misinterpreting depictions of armor in medieval artwork.

What do the studs do?! You are a simple soul aren't you? The studs look COOL. And adding shiny metal accents to your black leather is what any righteous EMO elf ranger needs, right up there with eye shadow and a tortured back story. What do the studs do, honestly...
Studs aren’t emo, they’re punk. Some forms of goth fashion also employ them, unsurprisingly as goth is an offshoot of punk. Emo is also an offshoot of punk, but studded leather was never really part of emo fashion, except in belts, and even that was mostly a result of burgeoning alt kids getting what ever random accessories from Hot Topic we thought were most likely to make the adults in our lives uncomfortable.
 
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Studded armor exists.
The system refers to mail as 'chainmail', and plate as 'platemail'.
What's called a bastard sword by the system is actually a longsword.
What's called a longsword by the system is actually an arming sword.
Guns are almost always exotic hard to use weapons rather than simple ones.
3e allowed combatants to leave melee with a 5' step without penalty, which violated the spirit of the rule and almost wrecked the entire edition all on its own.
Druids, Rangers, Paladins, and Barbarians are specific builds of an archetype, not an archetype in and of themselves.
People think psionics aren't magic.
Environmental systems for things like heat exhaustion almost always have non-transferable granularity that make them impractical in play. (Can't be converted easily between say hours and days, resulting in bundles of unnecessary dice rolls. Sometimes they even give granularity in 10 or 1 minute intervals, which is fine unless you want to roll 6 or 60 times an hour.)
 

Charlaquin

Explorer
The system refers to mail as 'chainmail', and plate as 'platemail'.
What's called a bastard sword by the system is actually a longsword.
What's called a longsword by the system is actually an arming sword.
These have actually been fixed in 5e. Well, it still calls mail “chainmail” but at least the term is just redundant instead of inaccurate. “Platemail” is just plate now, the bastard sword and long sword were appropriately combined into a single weapon called the longsword that can be used in one or two hands. They should call the shortsword an arming sword though.
 

Blue

Orcus on a bad day
The impossibility of "he and I move while staying together" in combat. Taking out the delay action just made some simple concepts impossible.

How the skill system enforces certain divisions. For instance, mechanically I can't model a character who is good at interacting with high society, from gossip to blackmail to formal dancing to heraldry, but are lousy at the same times of interactions on the streets, in the military, in gnomish culture, or whatever. If I'm stealthy I'm just as good at it while sneaking through a forest or a back ally - sure there's overlap, but practical skills are different. Same for Survival on an arctic mountain or sand-blasted desert plane.

Why the target rolls for some things affecting someone, and the defender rolls for others. Either make it always one or the other, or switch it to something like players always roll.
 

Laurefindel

Villager
Falling damage in D&D is linear? I mean come on, I’ve done physics, you’ve done physics, we all know that gravity is quadratic! And then what, out of a sudden drag goes from 0% to 100% as an opposing force?

And what about mass, volume and surface? You’re telling me a feather has the same terminal velocity in atmosphere as an anvil? What good is feather fall then!

and while we’re at it, there is no such a thing as “terminal velocity”. Its an asymptote, you can never “reach” theoretical terminal velocity.
 

Hriston

Explorer
The rapier should be called the arming sword.

Also, elves should not have a natural lifespan. I interpret the number of years given as the time after which they are overcome with the sorrows of the world and seek the West (Feywild) by either leaving the world physically or, if they cannot, leaving their bodies behind.
 
They should call the shortsword an arming sword though.
A short sword is a very different class of weapon than an arming sword.

Short sword refers to a weapon look more like a Cinquedea or a Xiphos than an arming sword. Basically, any over large dagger primarily employed as a stabbing weapon and which has the advantage of being wieldy in very close quarters.

I'm not going to really get into the fact that there are several styles of sword that do not neatly fit into either the traditional short or long categories.
 

drl2

Villager
Armor class is dumb. "To hit" should be agility/range/etc-based, and different kinds of armor should resist certain amounts of damage by type. Yeah, you'd have to figure this out for every monster and every defensive item so it's not gonna happen, but I just like the idea of the AC mechanic being separated.
 
Armor class is dumb. "To hit" should be agility/range/etc-based, and different kinds of armor should resist certain amounts of damage by type. Yeah, you'd have to figure this out for every monster and every defensive item so it's not gonna happen, but I just like the idea of the AC mechanic being separated.
I used to think this way as well, but the implementation to make that work is more complex than you might think. You think the hard part is working it out for every monster. That's the easy part. Basically this falls into a category of "game should be more realistic" where the cost of implementing that realism is actually high rather than low.
 

Blue

Orcus on a bad day
This is entirely possible with the Ready action.
Not unless one of the characters gives up all of their actions. Try you and a friend (or several) walking down a street while each doing something. It does not require that everybody but one give up all of their actions to walk in a line. See also: marching band. (Taking an action for CHR (Perform).)
 

Blue

Orcus on a bad day
Falling damage in D&D is linear? I mean come on, I’ve done physics, you’ve done physics, we all know that gravity is quadratic! And then what, out of a sudden drag goes from 0% to 100% as an opposing force?
Back in the time of one of the TSR-edition D&D editions they came out with this in Dragon magazine. It worked well from traps and such, but it made some general environmental hazards impossibly deadly.

If we're already accepted the game assumption that you can be hit several times by a battle axe, roasted by a dragon, and you're still fighting, then the realism of a 40' fall from failing a climb check on a cliff killing you was not in genre.
 

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