D&D 5E What rule(s) is 5e missing?

Reynard

Legend
Just out of curiosity:

What rules do you think are missing from 5e? I'm not really talking about minutiae like a missing spell or feat (but feel free; I'm not your dad). I am more talking about larger systems.

For example, I think domain management a la the BECMI Companion Set is a gaping hole in the game and would help solve the "no one plays past 13th level" problem.

Note also that I know lots of 3rd party companies have solved almost anything anyone might post in this thread, so I am referring specifically to official rules for the purpose of this discussion.
 

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payn

Legend
Not sure its a good idea, but there is a thread about interrogations going on right now. I do want an RPG that has rules for this but in a more battle of wits between investigator and suspect manner, less so in a physical torture way. Which is why its probably best left to another genre of RPG.
 

Reynard

Legend
Not sure its a good idea, but there is a thread about interrogations going on right now. I do want an RPG that has rules for this but in a more battle of wits between investigator and suspect manner, less so in a physical torture way. Which is why its probably best left to another genre of RPG.
I one worked up a "social combat" system that included styles of attacks (intimidation versus persuasion versus seduction, etc) with a "resolve" hit point system to provide victory condition. In other words I was trying to apply the combat system to social interactions. I got some push back from my players so I was never able to properly test it.
 

payn

Legend
I one worked up a "social combat" system that included styles of attacks (intimidation versus persuasion versus seduction, etc) with a "resolve" hit point system to provide victory condition. In other words I was trying to apply the combat system to social interactions. I got some push back from my players so I was never able to properly test it.
Sounds like a great idea, however, I would limit it to certain environments like an interrogation. Might be annoying every time you talk to a merchant or city watch to "fight" them socially.
 




Laurefindel

Legend
Domain management and large-scale combat is what comes to mind like you said, and it looks like we're about to get that soon.

Otherwise, everything else I can think of are campaign or setting specific. Better herbalism rules would be nice but it doesn't make sense to develop those and not potion making or magic item crafting and I don't know what else, without bloating the game with complex subsystems.
 






I one worked up a "social combat" system that included styles of attacks (intimidation versus persuasion versus seduction, etc) with a "resolve" hit point system to provide victory condition. In other words I was trying to apply the combat system to social interactions. I got some push back from my players so I was never able to properly test it.

Sounds like a great idea, however, I would limit it to certain environments like an interrogation. Might be annoying every time you talk to a merchant or city watch to "fight" them socially.

It was meant for an adventure focused on courtly intrigue.
I believe Mythras has something like that (at least M-Space does, which is based off the same engine). It works well-enough, but needs more fleshing out (It just uses social skills against 'hit points' coming from social and willpower stats. There needs to be actual different moves). Still, a good way of having more than just 'success, and by how much' as a resolution mechanic.
Skill challenges similar to (but not exactly like) D&D 4e skill challenges.

This is a fundamental thing. Overall skills and generalized task resolution is the sticky wicket of so many RPGs. Even games with more rigorous skill lists and modifiers (say, GURPS) often have trouble when they get to 'so how should we have my profession: psychologist skill actually play out?' Skill challenges was a solution. Plenty of argument as to how good it was. Something like this would go a long way to making the skill system in 5e seem less vestigial.
 


iserith

Magic Wordsmith
This is a fundamental thing. Overall skills and generalized task resolution is the sticky wicket of so many RPGs. Even games with more rigorous skill lists and modifiers (say, GURPS) often have trouble when they get to 'so how should we have my profession: psychologist skill actually play out?' Skill challenges was a solution. Plenty of argument as to how good it was. Something like this would go a long way to making the skill system in 5e seem less vestigial.
Yes, the main thing is that D&D 4e and 5e handle skills differently so in the latter it couldn't be something a player can "push" to make as it was in D&D 4e. That would fundamentally change how one would design a skill challenge in D&D 5e, but there could at least be some kind of resolution framework there and someone could do the math on how many successes before how many failures were appropriate given bounded accuracy and whatnot.
 


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