D&D Movie/TV Honor Among Thieves: The New D&D Movie Officially Announced

Paramount has announced the title of March 3rd, 2023's Dungeon's & Dragons movie -- and it's HONOR AMONG THIEVES!

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The cast includes some Hollywood heavyweights -- Chris Pine, Rege Jean Page, Michelle Rodriguez, Hugh Grant, and others. The release date was announced back in August:


‘Dungeons & Dragons’ reboot movie has officially wrapped up filming today (Aug. 19) in Belfast, Northern Ireland, Director John Francis Daley confirmed via his Twitter account. The film is currently set to be released on March 3, 2023.

Starring Chris Pine in the leading role, Paramount’s upcoming action fantasy movie officially began filming on April 29, with the cast and crew of around 60-70 people. The movie was also filmed reportedly in Iceland for a week or two.

Jonathan Goldstein is co-directing and writing the script for the film with John Francis Daley. Jeremy Latcham is producing through his deal with studio eOne, Hasbro’s entertainment arm. Hasbro’s Brian Goldner is also producing. Other producers also include Stephen Davis, Roy Lee, Courtney Solomon, and Allan Zeman. Denis L. Stewart is serving as executive producer.

Dungeons & Dragons is an upcoming American fantasy adventure film based on the RPG of the same name and a reboot of the film series of the same name. The plot details of the film are still kept under the wraps.

The film stars Chris Pine, Michelle Rodriguez, Regé-Jean Page, Justice Smith, Hugh Grant, Chloe Coleman, Jason Wong, Daisy Head, and Sophia Lillis. Regé-Jean Page is known for Shonda Rhimes’s wildly popular Bridgerton on Netflix, the actor wrapped his part in the first week of August. In December 2020, Chris Pine was cast to star in the film, he is reportedly getting $11.5 Million to star in this film. Michelle Rodriguez, Regé-Jean Page, Justice Smith, Hugh Grant, and Sophia Lillis joined the cast in the following months, with Grant cast as the antagonist, Forge Fletcher, and Lillis as Doric. My Spy star Chloe Coleman along with Jason Wong and Daisy Head also joined the ensemble cast. Wong is playing Dralas.

The cast also includes Nicholas Blane, Dan Poole, Barry O'Connor, Adrian Christopher, and Lati Gbaja.

Even before production started, the film had undergone numerous changes. The film was first announced by Warner Bros. in 2013 and then moved to Paramount in 2017. The film's release date has also changed significantly; it was originally scheduled for July 23, 2021. The release date was then pushed back to May 27, 2022, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and then to November 19, 2021, to accommodate the release of Mission: Impossible 7. The release date was pushed back to March 3, 2023, earlier this year (current release date).

Dungeons & Dragons is a leading fantasy entertainment franchise, fueled by the imagination of storytellers around the world. More than 40 million fans have interacted with or played D&D since it was first published 46 years ago.


 

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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey

Audiomancer

Adventurer
You make a point that fantasy has had most of its heavy hitters on the small screen for a while now, and with House of the Dragon and The Rings of Power coming later this year, that's not likely to change.

The Witcher was highly ranked as well. I think there's plenty of appetite for fantasy, there just haven't been any good movies released lately that had broad appeal.

The feature length movie format sucks for novelistic High Fantasy, and the nearly ten hour Lord of the zrings trilogy sort of proves that. Lord of the Rings would make a great 6 season TV show, in my opinion.

Lots of salient points about the lack of high-profile fantasy stories being made for film.

Another factor is the rise of streaming services, and the need to provide a steady diet of new content for those services. I don’t think it’s a coincidence that the Witcher, and the upcoming GoT and LOTR spin-offs, are being released that way. For what you might spend making a big-budget film (and maybe even less), you can get 8-12 hours of a streaming series. If it’s good, it encourages the audience to come back every week (where a movie only has a few weekends to make it’s money back). And you can get a second season a year later (movie sequels take about 3 years).
 

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Fantasy also has long existed in sprawling series. And Game of Thrones certainly proved the value of fantasy TV shows, as a brand, as a money-maker, as a cultural touchstone. Doing Wheel of Time as a movie series, even if you were to condense the mid-series Slog, would be an impossibility. On television, it certainly becomes much more feasible.

Another factor that should be mentioned is that the pandemic essentially shuttered theaters for a year and continued to have a chilling effect even after they reopened.

Lots of salient points about the lack of high-profile fantasy stories being made for film.

Another factor is the rise of streaming services, and the need to provide a steady diet of new content for those services. I don’t think it’s a coincidence that the Witcher, and the upcoming GoT and LOTR spin-offs, are being released that way. For what you might spend making a big-budget film (and maybe even less), you can get 8-12 hours of a streaming series. If it’s good, it encourages the audience to come back every week (where a movie only has a few weekends to make it’s money back). And you can get a second season a year later (movie sequels take about 3 years).
 







Heilemann

Explorer
It proves that done well, it breaks the format. It's a miniseries released.ib theaters. Abd hasn't been remotely imitated successfully on the big screen in 20 years.
I think it's a little reductive to call it 'a miniseries'. And no, nothing has come close on the big screen, but then that's arguably true for the small screen as well.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
I think it's a little reductive to call it 'a miniseries'. And no, nothing has come close on the big screen, but then that's arguably true for the small screen as well.
It's ten hours long. The story is more fit for a long form medium like TV, as are other fantasy novels.

Films as re more similar in structure to short stories, as can be seen in a review of the history of literary adaptations thst actuslly work.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
ten hours long
And could have been at least 3 hours longer (1 per film) and benefited from it.

Listening to the trilogy, rather than reading it, this time has given me a new appreciation for just how good a story it is, how much is lost if you take anything out of it, and how much I wish the movies had been 2 full films per book.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
And could have been at least 3 hours longer (1 per film) and benefited from it.

Listening to the trilogy, rather than reading it, this time has given me a new appreciation for just how good a story it is, how much is lost if you take anything out of it, and how much I wish the movies had been 2 full films per book.
I don't think Lord.pf the Rings will be remade anytime too soon, but inevitably it will be, and I think as a TV show.
 

I guess that movie will make more money than "Morbius", and ironically this characters is becoming famous, and this means more value as IP, thanks the memes in internet. And we know D&D can be a great potential source of inspiration for memes. Thanks this D&D can be more popular and known even if the movie didn't make a lot of money.

Let's remember the first movie "Hercules and the amazons", played by Kevin Smith (and Anthonny Quin as Zeus) wasn't a great hitbox, but it opened a door for the serie, and later this for a spin-off, the popular Xena the warrior princess.
 

Films as re more similar in structure to short stories, as can be seen in a review of the history of literary adaptations thst actuslly work.
The novella is the ideal length for a movie adaptation. We went through a phase of not seeing many of those because slim paperbacks where not profitable for publishers (there were more written late 19th/early 20th century, when magazine publishing was still a big thing). Now digital-only is big we will probably see more.

But the thing with fantasy and science fiction is the world building. The story itself might be quite brief, but you need to spend time establishing how the world works. Hence the success of franchises like Star Trek, Star Wars and MCU, where the world building is already done, and you can just focus on the story.
 

Heilemann

Explorer
It's ten hours long. The story is more fit for a long form medium like TV, as are other fantasy novels.

Films as re more similar in structure to short stories, as can be seen in a review of the history of literary adaptations thst actuslly work.
By that logic Back to the Future is likewise better fit for a TV show, which I don’t think it is. The two are radically different formats. LotR was spectacularly successful as films; that doesn’t automatically suggest it would thrive under the very different restrictions of a TV production. But I rest my case.
 

Now in the internet age some manga franchises started as web-novels, after webcomics, and later the published manga and in the end anime adaptation. White Wolf has created a seal "Dark Pack" where third parties are allowed to publish their own titles based in WoD, and even I have seen a webcomic based in Vampire: the Mascarade. I wonder if Hasbro/WotC should do something like this, but with different levels, for kid-friendly, teenages and mature audience (Ravenloft).

My hope is they aren't goind to lose money with this movie, and Hasbroi will sell a lot of merchandising products, as toys. Maybe to promote the movie they could use some images for templates for memes, for example "this is my face when..."
 


Parmandur

Book-Friend
By that logic Back to the Future is likewise better fit for a TV show, which I don’t think it is. The two are radically different formats. LotR was spectacularly successful as films; that doesn’t automatically suggest it would thrive under the very different restrictions of a TV production. But I rest my case.
Lord of the Rings was successful in film, in spite of the format working against them.

Back to the Future is an original film script stand alone movie that would easily fit a 10-20 page short story, that got a couple sequels that were, similarly, short story material.

Very different than the dense text that had to be massively truncated to fit 10-ish hours. Given the scope of multiple seasons, Lord of the Rings could be done real justice, rather than an action scene heavy Cliff Notes or Greatest Hits rush job treatment (which I did enjoy).
 

Let's remember the sequel of "Back to the Future" arrived years later, and this was planned. There was enough time to writte a better script, and the FXs were improved with the last advanced technology.
 

Heilemann

Explorer
Lord of the Rings was successful in film, in spite of the format working against them.

Back to the Future is an original film script stand alone movie that would easily fit a 10-20 page short story, that got a couple sequels that were, similarly, short story material.

Very different than the dense text that had to be massively truncated to fit 10-ish hours. Given the scope of multiple seasons, Lord of the Rings could be done real justice, rather than an action scene heavy Cliff Notes or Greatest Hits rush job treatment (which I did enjoy).
My argument isn’t that LotR couldn’t make a good TV show, I think it could. But rather than the poster I replied to using the film as an argument that it should have been a TV show, which makes no sense to me. And that by that logic e.g. BttF would likewise make for a great TV show.

Yes, long, detailed stories have time to breathe in the show format more so than in the film format. I would love to see LotR adapted for TV (by the right people etc).
 

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