What are you Reading? Noctilucent November 2019 edition

Ralif Redhammer

Adventurer
Halloween is over, and a bit of magic has gone out of the air. But books, books always have their own.

I finished reading the second half of the Elric Saga yesterday. Man, does that ending still pack a punch.

“Farewell, friend. I was a thousand times more evil than thou!”

Next up is Sapkowski's "Baptism of Fire." With the Witcher series on Netflix coming up soon, it's as good a reason as any to continue on in the book series.
 

Richards

Adventurer
I'm reading Deadlock by Iris Johansen. Basically, a pair of archaeologists get kidnapped and tortured for info by a crazed guy trying to find an ancient treasure. Then an occasional assassin for the CIA is hired to rescue them; he saves the woman but the man's already been tortured to death. And now they're running from the crazy guy and his army of hired thugs while figuring out a way to track not only him but the guy who hired him to kidnap the archaeologists in the first place. And the treasure is somehow tied to Rasputin, the Mad Monk. It's been...interesting thus far.

Johnathan
 

carrot

Explorer
Just finished Brent Weeks' The Burning White: Book 5 of lightbringer. It was a really enjoyable (if very long-winded) read right up until (just before) the "final battle". Unfortunately at that point it all just went a bit "meh". It rather felt like the author was trying to include every idea he'd ever had for what to do with all the main characters no matter how little it made sense. Since that was the last of the series, its rather fallen flat.

Now onto A pilgrimage of Swords by Anthony Ryan. Not far in yet, but so far so good...
 

Janx

Adventurer
finished These Violent Delights by Jessica Raney a few days back. A bloodsporty zombie romp with a deadly fun heroine.

Then I read Brandon Sanderson's Mitosis novella and am in the early stages of FireFight (book2 of whatever his evil super powereds series is called).
 

Nellisir

Adventurer
Sister Pelagia and the White Bulldog, by Boris Akunin. Rather good and enjoyable, except that the translator has followed the author's and russian tradition of using all the parts of a characters name at different times in different combinations (XYZ might be XY, or Z, or X, or XYZ...), which is correct, but... <flips through the book AGAIN to figure out who someone is...>

Also reading A Brief History of the Normans, and Judge Dee At Work (Robert Van Gulik). Highly recommend the Judge Dee books.
 

Rob Kuntz

Adventurer
Sister Pelagia and the White Bulldog, by Boris Akunin. Rather good and enjoyable, except that the translator has followed the author's and russian tradition of using all the parts of a characters name at different times in different combinations (XYZ might be XY, or Z, or X, or XYZ...), which is correct, but... <flips through the book AGAIN to figure out who someone is...>

Also reading A Brief History of the Normans, and Judge Dee At Work (Robert Van Gulik). Highly recommend the Judge Dee books.
Especially about the one bolded. Could be interesting!
 

Ralif Redhammer

Adventurer
Been there.

I suspect that the Brothers Karamazov would be about half the length if they just standardized everybody's names.

Rather good and enjoyable, except that the translator has followed the author's and russian tradition of using all the parts of a characters name at different times in different combinations (XYZ might be XY, or Z, or X, or XYZ...), which is correct, but... <flips through the book AGAIN to figure out who someone is...>
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Near the end of Presto! by Penn Jillette. It's ostensibly about him losing 100 lbs, but it's more like a travelogue of interesting things he did during that time where food comes up, with various food-focused nuggets scattered about. He's vulgar, makes a ridiculously large number of sexual references, and is hugely entertaining in doing so.

It's the first book by him I've ever read, and he's a real character. I could read more by him - but I'd want a break first. His writing is turned up to 11 with anecdotes and such that tend to blur with too many close to each other.

As a diet book, it doesn't budge the needle. As a inspiration to diet, it is likely decent for the type that like him and are willing to try something radical. As a chapter in the life of Penn Jillette - ah, that's what this really is.
 

Ralif Redhammer

Adventurer
Finished Baptism of Fire. I enjoyed it quite a bit, much more than the previous four Witcher novels (I know, I keep reading them).

Next up is Andre Norton's Witch World. I've whiffed on Norton before in the past, but wanted to give her another try.
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
So it's been a long while since I finished a novel in a sitting, but that was tonight with Spider-Man: The Darkest Hours by Jim Butcher. Part of it was that the novel didn't let up, it just carried you along with it, pacing immaculate. Another part was the writers knowledge of our favorite web-slinger (go ahead, dare tell me you have a web-slinger you like more) that just rang true and deep. But the last ingredient is that our friendly neighborhood Spider-Man is both smart and a smart-ass, and Jim Butcher is spot on at writing that combo, as his Dresden Files series shows.

Very entertaining. Oh, and for those who enjoy the MCU movies, the dialog for another character was so spot on that you would of had to work not to hear it in their voice. I'll leave out who - Spidey is known for his team-ups - so as not to spoil anything in case good sense overcomes you and you buy it immediately.
 

Richards

Adventurer
I finished Deadlock. Ugh. I cannot recommend it. The author somehow got it into her head to turn it into a love story, with the female archaeologist who was rescued by the CIA assassin falling for him and deciding to turn him around. She ended up being a Mary Sue - always right about everything - while he was willing to do anything she said because of his great love for her...no thanks. I thought I was reading an adventure thriller, not a love story. And the adventure part of it sucked - they never even found the MacGuffin they were supposed to be looking for, but that's okay because they found each other.... Just no. I'm striking Iris Johansen from my list of authors I'm willing to try - she had her chance and she blew it.

I'm now reading Dark Journey by A. R. Morlan. It's about a haunted carnival and it's a refreshing breath of fresh (actually, fetid and gloomy) air compared to the book I just plowed through out of sheer stubbornness.

Johnathan
 

Kramodlog

Naked and living in a barrel
Latium by Romain Lucazeau. A uchronic post-human space opera. Basically, the Roman Empire in space, but humans are all dead and huge spaceships piloted by godlike AIs try to find meaning in to their existance. And their is an alien/barbarian invasion looming, but the AIs can'thurt them because of their program (think Asimov's Three Laws). Ambitious.
 

Nellisir

Adventurer
Just finished Great North Road, by Peter F Hamilton. Very good space opera. Not a light read; the book clocks in at about a thousand pages and I only finished the last 500 because I literally was able to spend the entire day doing nothing but reading. I read Pandora's Star and Judas Unchained a few months ago and liked those as well. I still favor Alistair Reynolds, but Hamilton is a very solid read.

I also read a bunch of Polity novels by Neal Asher recently. Same general space opera feel as Reynolds & Hamilton, but not the same level. Decent. If Reynolds is a 5, and Hamilton a 4.5, then Asher is probably a 3.
 

KahlessNestor

Explorer
Currently reading two books. I'm about half through The Last Hero in Terry Pratchett's Discworld series. Unlike the others, this is a shorter and with gorgeous illustrations.

The other book that I'm reading while waiting for the next Pratchett book is Ron Chernow's biography of Ulysses S. Grant. It's an amazing look at a period in American history I'm not as familiar with, by the author who wrote the biography behind the musical Hamilton.
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Latium by Romain Lucazeau. A uchronic post-human space opera. Basically, the Roman Empire in space, but humans are all dead and huge spaceships piloted by godlike AIs try to find meaning in to their existance. And their is an alien/barbarian invasion looming, but the AIs can'thurt them because of their program (think Asimov's Three Laws). Ambitious.
That sounds, if you'll pardon the repetition, refreshingly fresh. When you finish please let us know your thoughts and if you'd recommend it.
 

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